Jump to content

Dans Capital [magasine]: Interview de C. de Margerie


phyvette

Recommended Posts

The World Has Plenty of Oil

By NANSEN G. SALERI

March 4, 2008; Page A17

Many energy analysts view the ongoing waltz of crude prices with the mystical $100 mark -- notwithstanding the dollar's anemia -- as another sign of the beginning of the end for the oil era. "[A]t the furthest out, it will be a crisis in 2008 to 2012," declares Matthew Simmons, the most vocal voice among the "neo-peak-oil" club. Tempering this pessimism only slightly is the viewpoint gaining ground among many industry leaders, who argue that daily production by 2030 of 100 million barrels will be difficult.

In fact, we are nowhere close to reaching a peak in global oil supplies.

Given a set of assumptions, forecasting the peak-oil-point -- defined as the onset of global production decline -- is a relatively trivial problem. Four primary factors will pinpoint its exact timing. The trivial becomes far more complex because the four factors -- resources in place (how many barrels initially underground), recovery efficiency (what percentage is ultimately recoverable), rate of consumption, and state of depletion at peak (how empty is the global tank when decline kicks in) -- are inherently uncertain.

- What are the global resources in place? Estimates vary. But approximately six to eight trillion barrels each for conventional and unconventional oil resources (shale oil, tar sands, extra heavy oil) represent probable figures -- inclusive of future discoveries. As a matter of context, the globe has consumed only one out of a grand total of 12 to 16 trillion barrels underground.

- What percentage of global resources is ultimately recoverable? The industry recovers an average of only one out of three barrels of conventional resources underground and considerably less for the unconventional.

This benchmark, established over the past century, is poised to change upward. Modern science and unfolding technologies will, in all likelihood, double recovery efficiencies. Even a 10% gain in extraction efficiency on a global scale will unlock 1.2 to 1.6 trillion barrels of extra resources -- an additional 50-year supply at current consumption rates.

The impact of modern oil extraction techniques is already evident across the globe. Abqaiq and Ghawar, two of the flagship oil fields of Saudi Arabia, are well on their way to recover at least two out of three barrels underground -- in the process raising recovery expectations for the remainder of the Kingdom's oil assets, which account for one quarter of world reserves.

Are the lessons and successes of Ghawar transferable to the countless struggling fields around the world -- most conspicuously in Venezuela, Mexico, Iran or the former Soviet Union -- where irreversible declines in production are mistakenly accepted as the norm and in fact fuel the "neo-peak-oil" alarmism? The answer is a definitive yes.

Hundred-dollar oil will provide a clear incentive for reinvigorating fields and unlocking extra barrels through the use of new technologies. The consequences for emerging oil-rich regions such as Iraq can be far more rewarding. By 2040 the country's production and reserves might potentially rival those of Saudi Arabia.

Paradoxically, high crude prices may temporarily mask the inefficiencies of others, which may still remain profitable despite continuing to use 1960-vintage production methods. But modernism will inevitably prevail: The national oil companies that hold over 90% of the earth's conventional oil endowment will be pressed to adopt new and better technologies.

- What will be the average rate of crude consumption between now and peak oil? Current daily global consumption stands around 86 million barrels, with projected annual increases ranging from 0% to 2% depending on various economic outlooks. Thus average consumption levels ranging from 90 to 110 million barrels represent a reasonable bracket. Any economic slowdown -- as intimated by the recent tremors in the global equity markets -- will favor the lower end of this spectrum.

This is not to suggest that global supply capacity will grow steadily unimpeded by bottlenecks -- manpower, access, resource nationalism, legacy issues, logistical constraints, etc. -- within the energy equation. However, near-term obstacles do not determine the global supply ceiling at 2030 or 2050. Market forces, given the benefit of time and the burgeoning mobility of technology and innovation across borders, will tame transitional obstacles.

- When will peak oil arrive? This widely accepted tipping point -- 50% of ultimately recoverable resources consumed -- is largely a tribute to King Hubbert, a distinguished Shell geologist who predicted the peak oil point for the U.S. lower 48 states. While his timing was very good (he forecast 1968 versus 1970 in fact), he underestimated peak daily production (9.5 million barrels actual versus eight million estimated).

But modern extraction methods will undoubtedly stretch Hubbert's "50% assumption," which was based on Sputnik-era technologies. Even a modest shift -- to 55% of recoverable resources consumed -- will delay the onset by 20-25 years.

Where do reasonable assumptions surrounding peak oil lead us? My view, subjective and imprecise, points to a period between 2045 and 2067 as the most likely outcome.

Cambridge Energy Associates forecasts the global daily liquids production to rise to 115 million barrels by 2017 versus 86 million at present. Instead of a sharp peak per Hubbert's model, an undulating, multi-decade long plateau production era sets in -- i.e., no sudden-death ending.

The world is not running out of oil anytime soon. A gradual transitioning on the global scale away from a fossil-based energy system may in fact happen during the 21st century. The root causes, however, will most likely have less to do with lack of supplies and far more with superior alternatives. The overused observation that "the Stone Age did not end due to a lack of stones" may in fact find its match.

The solutions to global energy needs require an intelligent integration of environmental, geopolitical and technical perspectives each with its own subsets of complexity. On one of these -- the oil supply component -- the news is positive. Sufficient liquid crude supplies do exist to sustain production rates at or near 100 million barrels per day almost to the end of this century.

Technology matters. The benefits of scientific advancement observable in the production of better mobile phones, TVs and life-extending pharmaceuticals will not, somehow, bypass the extraction of usable oil resources. To argue otherwise distracts from a focused debate on what the correct energy-policy priorities should be, both for the United States and the world community at large.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120459389654809159.html

Link to comment

Tu veux qu'on peut encore brûler du pétrole à qui mieux-mieux ?

Mais, c'est horrrrrrible, ça ! Tous les altermondialistes vont hurler ! On n'est pas foutuuuuuuuuuuus !

Link to comment

Bonjour,

Interressant Lucilio.

Un autre point d'un ex-vice-président de la même société, ARAMCO…

Comme quoi, même dans les sociétés pétrolières les plus puissantes, les avis divergent…

Concernant l'article que tu cites, c'est une argumentation très classique des négationnistes du pic

et de la déplétion des énergies fossiles en général :

1 - La technologie résoudra tous nos problèmes.

2 - La hauteur des prix incitera les entreprises et les états à investir et prendre des dispositions qui résoudront tout nos problèmes.

La phrase la plus importante de cet article :

"in all likelihood"

En d'autres termes, très probablement, c'est à dire : peut être !

Bref, il n'en sait rien :doigt:

Je trouve que c'est d'une grande précision scientifique, à prendre très très au sérieux !

Deux gros problèmes à cet argumentaire :

Sur la technologie, peut être pourriez vous prendre la peine de consulter le point de vue

d'experts indépendants en la matière, comme Jean François Giannesini. Pas du tout le même optimisme sur les capacités de

la technique à nous tirer de cette mauvaise passe. Il y en a d'autres…

Sur la réactivité des acteurs du marché, le problème majeur c'est le temps.

Les entreprises ont une vision à court terme, or les investissements à faire sont extremment lourds, coûtent des dizaines de milliards de dollars, nécessitent de former une grande quantité de personnel hautement qualifié, et enfin, aboutissent ou bout de 5, 6, 7 ans.

A l'heure actuelle, rien ne dit que les investissements réalisés aujourd'hui permettront de se substituer aux pertes de production occasionnées par la déplétion d'une bonne partie des champs en exploitation dans le monde, et je ne parle même pas d'une augmentation de production capable de soutenir la demande !

La courbe de la demande a croisé celle de l'offre il y a 1 ou 2 ans (selon qui publie les stats), d'où la montée actuelle des cours. (plus la faiblesse du dollars, les tensions géopolitiques et la spéculation mais se sont des éléments périphériques et non des moteurs)

D'éminents économistes comme vous devraient comprendre ça aisément…

En conclusion, les prix vont augmenter, augmenter, augmenter, augmenter, augmenter… jusqu'à ce que le coût de la guerre soit inférieur au prix de la paix, et ce dans la plage de temps qui va de aujourd'hui à … jusqu'à ce que nous trouvions une énergie de substitution équivalente en facilité d'utilisation et en volume… ce qui n'est même pas encore envisageable au stade de la recherche fondamentale, c'est dire à que c'est pas pour demain, mais peut être dans 20, 30 ou 40 ans…

Alors comment intégrer ces vérités dans votre idéologie/religion libérale ?

Sans remise en question (partielle) de vos idoles pour la plupart mortes depuis belle lurette et n'ayant jamais envisager cette nouvelle problématique mondiale, point de salut pour votre évolution intellectuelle :icon_up:

Pourquoi je poste ce message sur un tel forum ?

Je ne sais pas, par sympathie pour Phyvette et son point de vue peut être, ou encore pour tenter une nouvelle fois d'éclairer les pôvres croyants que vous êtes, car si un seul d'entre vous accepte de simplement réexaminer sa foi pour y faire entrer un peu de raison, alors mon post n'aura pas été totalement inutile :mrgreen:

Les admins peuvent effacer ce post iconoclastes s'ils le désirent, je ne serais pas vexé :mrgreen:

Bonne soirée :mrgreen:

Link to comment
Alors comment intégrer ces vérités dans votre idéologie/religion libérale ?

Sans remise en question (partielle) de vos idoles pour la plupart mortes depuis belle lurette et n'ayant jamais envisager cette nouvelle problématique mondiale, point de salut pour votre évolution intellectuelle :icon_up:

Cela n'a rien à voir avec le libéralisme, mais avec la Vérité.

Link to comment
Les entreprises ont une vision à court terme

Bon, il faudrait voir à arrêter avec cet argument à la mords-moi le noeud. Les entreprises ont une vision qui correspond à leur marché. Une entreprise qui produit des ordinateurs portables a une vision du marché à court terme alors qu'une entreprise qui produit du cognac a une vision à beaucoup plus long terme… Mais dans les deux cas, il s'agit de spéculation (on ne peut pas prévoir l'avenir avec certitude, que l'on soit une entreprise ou un gouvernement). Et crois-moi, s'il y a du profit à faire dans le futur, des gens y travaillent dès aujourd'hui.

Link to comment
En conclusion, les prix vont augmenter, augmenter, augmenter, augmenter, augmenter… jusqu'à ce que le coût de la guerre soit inférieur au prix de la paix, et ce dans la plage de temps qui va de aujourd'hui à … jusqu'à ce que nous trouvions une énergie de substitution équivalente en facilité d'utilisation et en volume

Nous avons une énergie de substitution aux pétroles : le charbon.

Link to comment
Nous avons une énergie de substitution aux pétroles : le charbon.

Voilà un argument qui compte. A périmètre constant , sans croissance , sans hausse de la démographie , et sans la fin du pétrole , il y en a pour env 250 ans . Mais c'est faux bien sûr, en réalité sans doutes moins de 100 ans. Et avec à la clef une pollution aux gaz à effet de serre , digne de la troisième extinction massive des espèces du Permien ! Mais en 200 ans au lieux de 30 000 ans .

P_03BA~1.GIF

Link to comment
Oui bien sûr, on peu faire comme tu le dis , et c'est à peu près ce qui ce passe, en définitive, les lois du marché s'imposent. La régulation s'opère par le prix .

C'est valable pour beaucoup de choses dont on maîtrise la production , les opérateurs ajustant les volumes dans l'intérêt général avec la concurrence comme garde-fou , et cela a bien fonctionné depuis plus d'un siècle avec le pétrole .

Mais si on ne contrôle plus la production pour des raisons d'épuisement de stocks géologique , il n'est pas certain que le marché soit la meilleur solution .

Je ne sais si je n'exprime très clairement , mais j'espère.

Si tu es si sur que le prix du pétrole va exploser alors achète un petit puits (avec l'aide d'un crédit et de tes amis si il le faut), et attends que les prix grimpent très haut pour l'exploiter pleinement. Ainsi l'effet sera, à ton échelle, le même qu'une taxe (tu retires du pétrole du marché actuel pour le garder pour plus tard) mais c'est toi qui assumes les conséquences de tes prévisions (en bien ou en mal) et non les autres.

Ce mécanisme (en plus subtil) basé sur les multiples décisions des agents qui s'y connaissent et qui assument leurs responsabilités est nécessairement plus efficace que quelque décisions centralisés d'hommes politiques irresponsables (leurs choix sont sans conséquences personnelles) et agissant sous la pression populaire.

Link to comment
Voilà un argument qui compte. A périmètre constant , sans croissance , sans hausse de la démographie , et sans la fin du pétrole , il y en a pour env 250 ans . Mais c'est faux bien sûr, en réalité sans doutes moins de 100 ans. Et avec à la clef une pollution aux gaz à effet de serre , digne de la troisième extinction massive des espèces du Permien ! Mais en 200 ans au lieux de 30 000 ans .

P_03BA~1.GIF

J'adore cette masturbation intellectuelle, surtout lorsqu'elle est alimentée par des types qui sont infoutus de donner une estimation correcte du temps qu'il va faire au delà de 5 jours. Dans le même genre on a les démographes qui n'ont pas vu le bond en avant de la population planétaire et qui maintenant se secouent la matière grise à grand coups de prédictions catastrophistes.

Comme disait Gabin, je sais, je sais qu'on ne sait jamais, mais ça je le sais.

Link to comment
Pas d'à priori , mais tu ne peut nier qu'un pont construit en France crée plus d'emploi et de PIB qu'une tour à Dubaï.

Comment tu le sais ? A moins que tu ne comptes pour rien les emplois crées à Dubaï ? Préférence nationale je présume. :icon_up:

Pour le reste une chose est sure : la taxe sur le pétrole fait monter son prix. Certes on achète moins de matières premières à l'étranger et ainsi "l'argent reste en France" ce qui améliore la balance commerciale mais c'est l'argument protectionniste classique dont l'absence de pertinence a été démontré jusqu'à plus soif.

Link to comment
Bonjour,

[…]

Bonne soirée :icon_up:

Tout ceci est ridiculement faux. Le "marché" voit à long terme : même si j'ai l'intention de vendre dans six mois un bien je sais que son prix dépendra de ses perspectives futures donc je dois prendre en compte le plus long terme. Mon horizon est potentiellement infini (seul l'incertitude et la préférence temporelle le réduit), l'horizon d'un homme politique se limite à sa prochaine élection (les difficultés prévisibles de ceux qui vont le suivre n'est pas son problème, les difficultés prévisibles des futurs propriétaires de mon bien me concerne car cela influe sur ma capacité à le vendre à un bon prix).

Cela dit personne ne peut rien faire contre les limites de la nature.

Link to comment
Alors comment intégrer ces vérités dans votre idéologie/religion libérale ?

Sans remise en question (partielle) de vos idoles pour la plupart mortes depuis belle lurette et n'ayant jamais envisager cette nouvelle problématique mondiale, point de salut pour votre évolution intellectuelle

Je peux savoir ce que le libéralisme a à voir avec la quantité restante de pétrole?

Link to comment
Je peux savoir ce que le libéralisme a à voir avec la quantité restante de pétrole?

+1

D'ailleurs je me demande pourquoi on n'a pas encore d'illuminés qui viennent remettre en question le libéralisme parce qu'il n'y aura pas assez d'IPv4.

Link to comment
Oh que nenni, point de rancœur ! Je m'interroge simplement sur les mécanismes profonds qui font que quelqu'un en vienne à demander plus d'impôts alors qu'il admet lui-même ne pas rouler sur l'or, à demander des mesures drastiques (et coercitives) contre des moyens de transport qu'il utilise lui-même, et, de façon générale, à vouloir imposer sa vision des choses en utilisant le biais (et le bâton) offert par l'état pour y arriver. Je me demande aussi pourquoi une richesse, quand elle est créé à côté de l'être en question, vaut plus que lorsqu'elle bénéficie à un lointain voisin ? La question sous-jacente est : quelle jalousie secrète, quel ressentiment envieux se tapit au fond de son cœur pour qu'il en vienne à dire "Mieux vaut un petit pont ici qu'une grande tour à Dubaï" ? Le vendeur de pétrole (ou de sucettes colorées, pour le coup, c'est pareil) n'a donc pas le droit d'utiliser son argent comme il l'entend ? L'enrichissement par la vente est alors, et semble-t-il dans son esprit, assujetti au besoin nécessaire de faire le bien, malgré tout et surtout contre celui qui a gagné de l'argent : il ne peut y avoir de riche d'un côté que s'il y a un bon gros impôt pour tempérer tout ça, une jolie taxe joufflue pour assurer une plus juste répartition !

Je me pose une autre question : pourquoi, pour ce genre de personnes, en dehors de l'Etat, point de salut ?

Tout ça, phyvette, (l'envie, la jalousie, le besoin compulsif et irraisonné de faire le bien de ceux qui ne t'ont rien demandé, le passage par l'Etat, etc…) c'est la base du socialisme le plus banal, du collectivisme initial, celui-là même qui fait trotter tes semblables, le sourire aux lèvres, sur la route de la servitude. Elle commence par de vertes prairies, qu'on ne peut, bien sûr, jamais atteindre, puis termine par l'enfer des dictatures totalitaires les plus sanglantes.

Pour ma part, je ne suis pas prêt à badauder sur cette route. Tu y trottines.

H16, cette tirade est d'antologie ! Tout le cheminement de l'insidieux socialisme assassin y est décrit avec une justesse. Chapeau bas !

Link to comment

-Si comme il est permis de le penser la ressource doit s'épuiser un jour plus ou moins proche .

-Si le CO2 a une influence néfaste sur le climat comme le prêtant un consensus scientifique autour du GIEC.

-Et si les prix des énergies doivent monter, limités seulement par la douleur du prix.

Alors peut être est il de bonne gouvernance de favoriser la sobriété de nos véhicules et de nos logis. Par anticipation , la fiscalité étant un signal fort au marché pour ne pas attendre un retour "a la normal"

illusoire . Il me semble .

Dans ce cas fonce sur le marché et investit avant les autres dans les éoliennes, tu pourra devenir richissime.

En même temps même si tu a tord en ne le faisant que pour faire la chasse au subventions, tu a des chances de bien t'en tirer si tu as le carnet d'adresse qui va bien pour profiter du con-tribuable.

Mais visiblement tu n'est pas si convaincu que ça de ce que tu affirme.

Link to comment

Je te trouve assez agressif envers cette personne qui n'agit absolument pas comme un troll, et qui cherche juste à enclencher une discussion.

Une des forces du libéralisme est sa cohérence philosophique et pratique. Plutôt que d'insulter les gens qui sont selon toi dans l'erreur, ne serait-il pas mieux d'argumenter pour lui démontrer point par point en quoi cette personne a tort? Au pire, tu peux l'ignorer, mais je ne vois pas l'intérêt d'être aussi agressif.

Par ailleurs je suis tout à fait d'accord avec toi sur ce sujet. Les mécanismes de marché sont tout à fait adaptés, nul besoin de faire appel à l'Etat ou un pseudo patriotisme économique. Il est d'ailleurs intéressant de noter que la recherche (privée) sur les énergies alternatives est en plein boom, et on peut raisonnablement penser que de nouvelles avancées permettront à ces énergies de devenir rentables au cours des prochaines décennies. Pas besoin d'affoler la population avec le scénario catastrophe de la fin du pétrole, la relève est en cours de préparation.

Tu confonds Libéral avec Pacifiste Gnangnan. Ici, on discute avec Qui On Veut, et on Rejete Les Points De Vue De Merde quand on veut.

Il nous plaît, parfois, d'avoir quelques contradicteurs lorsque ceux-ci sont polis et documentés. On tolère parfois un gougnaffier à grelots qui amuse la galerie, et, comme toute bonne tablée, nous conservons une place pour le pauvre (en esprit), celui qui n'a pas un argument plus solide que l'autre, mais qui mérite bien, lui aussi, de temps en temps, de se nourrir à la puissante et revigorante source libérale.

Mais faudrait voir à pas pousser le bouchon trop loin.

Individuelle. Responsabilité Individuelle.

Le groupisme grégaire des entichés de l'interventionnisme, merci, non, sans façon.

A propos de voiture, je suppose que les apôtres de la réduction massive de calories appliquent à eux-mêmes leurs bonnes idées : petites conso électriques, pas de voiture bien sûr, etc…

Mmmh ?

Link to comment
Je te trouve assez agressif envers cette personne qui n'agit absolument pas comme un troll, et qui cherche juste à enclencher une discussion.

Oh, mais j'en ai sous le pied !

Une des forces du libéralisme est sa cohérence philosophique et pratique. Plutôt que d'insulter les gens qui sont selon toi dans l'erreur, ne serait-il pas mieux d'argumenter pour lui démontrer point par point en quoi cette personne a tort? Au pire, tu peux l'ignorer, mais je ne vois pas l'intérêt d'être aussi agressif.

Insulter ? Mmmh. Où ? Les adjectifs ne lui étaient pas accolés, soit dit en passant.

Le fait de bousculer un intervenant dans ses retranchements ne constitue pas une insulte. C'est un forum, pas un salon de thé. Et puis Jess a un passif sur ce forum.

Link to comment
C'est un forum, pas un salon de thé.

Horresco referens !

Oil Price Bubble?

Supply is up, demand is down, yet the price is soaring. Here's why.

Ronald Bailey | March 12, 2008

Oil prices climbed to their highest level ever, reaching over $108 per barrel this week. And Americans are feeling this price spike at the pump, with gasoline averaging $3.22 per gallon. An analysis released by the investment firm Goldman Sachs suggested that oil prices might soar to $200 per barrel. Does this make sense?

Not really. Although U.S. crude oil inventories have fallen, gasoline inventories are at their highest since March, 1993, notes Tim Evans, an energy futures analyst at Citigroup's Futures Perspective. World oil production was up 2.5 percent in the first quarter of 2008 over the same period in 2007 while world oil consumption rose by just 2 percent. In fact, world production is projected to be 3.3 percent higher in the second quarter and 4.1 percent higher in the third quarter than the same periods a year ago. On the other hand, world demand is projected to rise by just 1.6 percent over the next six months.

In fact, demand is falling in some countries. According to economist John Kemp at the commodities firm Sempra Metals, the U.S. consumed 4 percent less petroleum in January 2008 than it did the year before. Evans agrees, noting that the U.S. demand for petroleum products began falling off last July. Interestingly, this drop in U.S. oil consumption began before crude prices turned vertical and before we began to see weakness in the broader economy. Even China's thirst for oil is abating somewhat. Its demand for oil, which once rose at 10 percent per year, has now dropped to 6 percent per year. In addition, world surplus oil production capacity has gone from a very tight 1.5 million barrels per day a couple of years ago to more than 3 million barrels today, says petroleum economist Michael Lynch.

So supply is up; relative demand is down and yet, the price of oil is soaring. What's going on? Last week, Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson blamed a third of the recent run up in oil prices on the weak dollar, another third on geopolitical uncertainty, and the rest on market speculation.

Let's start with geopolitical uncertainties. Last year, oil consumers watched warily as unrest in Nigeria's oil fields, the possibility of war between the U.S. and Iran, and the antics of Venezuela's Hugo Chavez threatened to disrupt oil supplies. That analysis may have once made sense, but most of those tensions have abated in recent months. Nevertheless, it remains true that most of the world's oil is produced in volatile regions and by erratic governments, so the price of crude must still include some kind of political risk premium.

What effect does the falling dollar have on the price of crude? Most oil price contracts are denominated in dollars. The dollar has fallen in value by more than 30 percent against a Federal Reserve index of major currencies since 2002. This means that the price of imports, including oil, have gone up. To some extent, the chief of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) Chakib Khelil was correct when he said earlier this week, "What's happening in the oil market is due to the mismanagement of the U.S. economy." Continuing U.S. trade and fiscal deficits along with lower interest rates are stoking inflationary fears.

That brings us to speculation. Evans observes that since September 2003, the total number of open crude oil futures and options contracts rose by 364 percent. Meanwhile the global demand for petroleum rose by just 8.2 percent. "So the futures and options market has become more important than the physical supplies in driving the price," concludes Evans. "We are seeing investment flows into the oil market that don't have anything to do with the demand and supply of oil."

Investors are treating oil as a hedge against inflation and a falling dollar. Oil markets are part of a negative positive feedback loop in which higher oil prices contribute to higher inflation, which in turn lowers the value of the dollar, which boosts oil prices, and so forth. In other words, the oil market is coming to resemble the gold market (which has also been soaring). Evans notes that most gold traders don't even ask the question of how much gold was mined last year or how much spare gold mining capacity there is.

In the short run, oil prices are very inelastic: A large change in price produces only a small change in demand. If the price of gas goes up a dollar per gallon overnight, you still have to fill your tank to get to work. However, over the long run, consumers and producers respond to higher oil prices. For example, Americans are driving less and have switched to buying more fuel efficient cars.

Higher prices also encourage innovation. Economist Richard Rahn from the Institute for Global Economic Growth believes battery technologies are improving so rapidly that the majority of cars sold in 10 years will be all-electric. This would certainly help drive down the price of oil. Supply is also inelastic—it takes a long time to do the exploration, drilling, and refining necessary to boost production in response to higher prices. This inelasticity of demand and supply means that petroleum prices are very sensitive to relatively small changes in either. This means that prices can fall as steeply has they rose.

Whenever you begin to hear market gurus decree that "this time it's different," as we did during the dot-com bubble and the housing bubble, that's a sure sign of danger in the market. Naturally, proponents of the peak oil theory claim that the recent run up in prices is evidence that the end is nigh. Evans responds, "Fears of peak oil are what this market has in common with the 1980s, not what is different." Recall that during the "oil crisis" of the 1970s when oil prices were as high as they are today, U.S. oil consumption declined by 13 percent between 1973 and 1983. The higher prices of the 1970s led eventually to an oil glut and prices fell to about $10 a barrel by 1986.

So what will happen to oil prices over the next few years? No one is predicting $10 per barrel oil. However, once the current bubble bursts, both Evans and Lynch believe that the price of crude will settle at around $60 to $70 per barrel in the next couple of years. "It's very hard to pinpoint just how long a bubble can expand before it breaks. Getting the timing right is not an easy matter," says Evans. But he adds, "I think that this is the riskiest time to be long in crude oil since 1980."

http://www.reason.com/news/show/125414.html

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...