Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Je parlais bien sûr de renvoyer les rayons après qu'ils aient été concentrés. En gros ça créerait un rayon lumineux de quelques centimètres carrés de section, qui aurait la même puissance que celle captée par la parabole (c.a.d pour environ un mètre carré). Je ferai un schéma un de ces quat' pour qu'on voit bien de quoi je parle.

Pour un m² de surface d'origine, c'est tout a fait faisable, ça reste des petites densités d'énergie, moi je voyais quelque chose de plus ambitieux, une matrice d’un bon km² de réflecteurs asservis, une hiérarchie de tours de concentration, enfin un rayon de la mort respectable quoi. :devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour un m² de surface d'origine, c'est tout a fait faisable, ça reste des petites densités d'énergie, moi je voyais quelque chose de plus ambitieux, une matrice d’un bon km² de réflecteurs asservis, une hiérarchie de tours de concentration, enfin un rayon de la mort respectable quoi. :devil:

Ben un m² c'est pour une parabole. L'idée est effectivement de faire une ferme de paraboles. Bon, tu me diras on peut faire aussi un parc de miroirs plats à la manière du truc déjà évoqué en Espagne. Mais les contraintes géométriques dont je parlais font qu'il serait amha bcp plus facile de concentrer les rayons si ils sont déjà au préalable pré-concentrés. Tout simplement parce que les rayons prennent "moins de place" et ont donc moins de chance de se faire mutuellement "de l'ombre".

Mais surtout, ça met l'expérience à la portée du bricoleur du dimanche, qui peut déjà faire des petits rayons de la mort sympa avec juste deux ou trois paraboles.

Le top du top serait effectivement d'asservir le tout, de telle sorte qu'on puisse immédiatement concentrer les rayons en n'importe quel point de l'espace, juste en entrant ses coordonnées.

PS. l'un des intérêts de projeter le point focal d'une parabole serait je pense de faciliter l'utilisation du truc pour fondre des métaux. Ici par exemple un mec y parvient mais il galère quand même pas mal:

_5NyZCu2d_c

Je pense que s'il utilisait une lentille divergente pour projeter son point focal, ce serait plus facile et surtout il pourrait cumuler les sources (en l'occurence il pourrait utiliser plusieurs lentilles de Fresnel).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Goldberg: America's 'green' quagmire

The 'greening' of the country, including the creation of green jobs, has proved unworkable and expensive.

By Jonah Goldberg

August 23, 2011

It was a massive flatbed truck, flanked by smaller vehicles brandishing "oversized load" banners, carrying a huge white thing.

I think the first one I saw was in Ohio. But I know that by the time I passed Grand Island, Neb., I'd lost count.

What was it? At first, it looked like it could be a replacement for the Swords of Qādisīyah — that giant crossed blades sculpture in central Baghdad.

And then, the aha: It was a propeller blade for a wind turbine, a really big one.

I've seen plenty of wind farms, but I'd never seen the blades being transported for construction. Last week I saw a lot of them.

Why? Because they were on the road, and so was I. My 8-year-old daughter and I were on a summer adventure. We drove more than 2,000 miles from Washington, D.C. to, eventually, Steamboat Springs, Colo. (Don't worry, I did most of the highway driving.)

Something about seeing all those turbine propellers made me think of wartime mobilization, like FDR's ramp-up during the Lend-Lease period or Josef Stalin's decision to send Soviet heavy industry east of the Urals.

The comparison isn't completely daft, either. The notion that we should move to a war footing on energy has been a reigning cliche of U.S. politics ever since Jimmy Carter's Oval Office energy crisis address in 1977. "This difficult effort will be the 'moral equivalent of war' — except that we will be uniting our efforts to build and not to destroy."

Ever since, we've been hearing that green must become the new red, white and blue.

It's difficult to catalog all of the problems with this nonsense. For starters, the mission keeps changing. Is the green energy revolution about energy independence? Or is it about fighting global warming? Or is it about jobs?

For most of the last few years the White House and its supporters have been saying it's about all three. But that's never been true. If we want energy independence (and I'm not sure why we would) or if we want to reduce our dependence on Middle Eastern oil (a marginally better proposition, given that Canada and often Mexico supply the U.S. with more oil than Saudi Arabia), we would massively expand our domestic drilling for oil and gas and our use of coal or carbon-free nuclear. That would also create lots of jobs that can't be exported (you can't drill for American oil in China, but we can, and do, buy lots of Chinese-made solar panels).

As for the windfall in green jobs, that has always been a con job.

For instance, Barack Obama came into office insisting that Spain was beating the U.S. in the rush for green jobs. Never mind that in Spain — where unemployment is now at 21% — the green jobs boom has been a bust. One major 2009 study by researchers at King Juan Carlos University found that the country destroyed 2.2 jobs in other industries for every green job it created, and the Spanish government has spent more than half a million euros for each green job created since 2000. Wind industry jobs cost a cool $1 million euros apiece.

The record in America has been no better, Obama's campaign stump speeches notwithstanding. The New York Times, which has been touting the green agenda in its news pages for years, admitted last week that "federal and state efforts to stimulate creation of green jobs have largely failed, government records show." Even Obama's former green jobs czar concedes the point, as do other leading Democrats, including Rep. Maxine Waters of Los Angeles.

Perhaps the most pathetic part of the war to green America is how unwarlike it really is. The New York Times also reported that California's "weatherization program was initially delayed for seven months while the federal Department of Labor determined prevailing wage standards for the industry," a direct sop to labor unions. And afterward, the inflated costs made the program too expensive for homeowners.

Green jobs, like shovel-ready jobs, proved a myth in no small part because Obama is eager to talk as if this green stuff was the moral equivalent of war, but he's not willing or able to do things a real war requires.

What we're left with is not the moral equivalent of war but the moral equivalent of a quagmire. A very expensive quagmire.

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-goldberg-green-20110823,0,4353091.column

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[faré]Il n'existe pas d'énergie renouvelable. Toute énergie est fossile.[/faré]

allez hop |signature

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pour moi l'agro fuel doit se trouver dans la section Nos zamis les zécolos

plutot que dans les energies renouvelables…

a moins que je comprenne pas tout a fait le sens

Le 2.

Grosse tache noire pour le gouverneur du Texas Rick Perry, candidat à l'investiture. Imaginez ceci à l'échelle fédérale : http://www.masterresource.org/2011/08/rick-perrys-7-billion-problem/#more-16435

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chez nos amis belges:

http://www.lavenir.net/Article/Detail.aspx?articleID=DMF20110915_00045185

« Une centrale éolienne oscille en permanence entre production zéro et production maximale. L’ajustement passe par des centrales au gaz qui travaillent en miroir face aux oscillations des éoliennes »

« Plus il y a de vent, plus il y a de CO2 »

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Instant Hum hum ?

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/artificial-leaf-0930.html

‘Artificial leaf’ makes fuel from sunlight

Solar cell bonded to recently developed catalyst can harness the sun, splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen.

Researchers led by MIT professor Daniel Nocera have produced something they’re calling an “artificial leaf”: Like living leaves, the device can turn the energy of sunlight directly into a chemical fuel that can be stored and used later as an energy source.

The artificial leaf — a silicon solar cell with different catalytic materials bonded onto its two sides — needs no external wires or control circuits to operate. Simply placed in a container of water and exposed to sunlight, it quickly begins to generate streams of bubbles: oxygen bubbles from one side and hydrogen bubbles from the other. If placed in a container that has a barrier to separate the two sides, the two streams of bubbles can be collected and stored, and used later to deliver power: for example, by feeding them into a fuel cell that combines them once again into water while delivering an electric current.

The creation of the device is described in a paper published Sept. 30 in the journal Science. Nocera, the Henry Dreyfus Professor of Energy and professor of chemistry at MIT, is the senior author; the paper was co-authored by his former student Steven Reece PhD ’07 (who now works at Sun Catalytix, a company started by Nocera to commercialize his solar-energy inventions), along with five other researchers from Sun Catalytix and MIT.

The device, Nocera explains, is made entirely of earth-abundant, inexpensive materials — mostly silicon, cobalt and nickel — and works in ordinary water. Other attempts to produce devices that could use sunlight to split water have relied on corrosive solutions or on relatively rare and expensive materials such as platinum.

The artificial leaf is a thin sheet of semiconducting silicon — the material most solar cells are made of — which turns the energy of sunlight into a flow of wireless electricity within the sheet. Bound onto the silicon is a layer of a cobalt-based catalyst, which releases oxygen, a material whose potential for generating fuel from sunlight was discovered by Nocera and his co-authors in 2008. The other side of the silicon sheet is coated with a layer of a nickel-molybdenum-zinc alloy, which releases hydrogen from the water molecules.

Je ne connais pas le rendement, mais si tout ceci est solide, alors on tient un truc intéressant, là. Très très intéressant.

edit : rendement de 2.5%… C'est faible, probablement améliorable, et reste intéressant puisque ce qui est produit (des gaz) est stockable et transportable bien plus facilement que le courant d'une cellule photovoltaïque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

117322.strip.print.gif

Ce cartoon peut servir assez souvent :)

Dans tous les cas, laissons faire la loi de Moore, plutôt que le gouvernement. Les progrès sur les semi-conducteurs amèneront un jour les panneaux solaires à maturité. Et c'est impossible d'accélérer ça avec de l'argent gratuit…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je réalise que ma contribution, juste après celle de h16 peut paraître un peu sèche (alors que je n'avais pas du tout envie de donner l'impression de dénigrer le lien qu'il fournit).

Pour apporter une pierre à l'édifice sur l'avancée des semi-conducteurs, une petite infographie qui montre les progrès des différentes cellules pour le solaire :

(J'espère que l'image, un peu grande, ne va pas tout casser. C'est du wikipedia…)

PVeff%28rev110901%29.jpg

On voit bien que d'ici une paire de décennie, on pourra disposer de cellules à 50% d'efficacité, pour le grand public. Laissons le temps au marché…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Très bon édito dans le magazine Power, avec un tableau des subventions par MWh produits, et l'évolution de 2007 à 2010.

http://www.powermag.com/renewables/solar/Chart-a-New-Course_3955.html

Question : puisque le coût des renouvelables se rapproche de plus en plus des sources d'énergies abondantes fiables et abordables, pourquoi cette évolution ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Très bon édito dans le magazine Power, avec un tableau des subventions par MWh produits, et l'évolution de 2007 à 2010.

http://www.powermag….ourse_3955.html

Question : puisque le coût des renouvelables se rapproche de plus en plus des sources d'énergies abondantes fiables et abordables, pourquoi cette évolution ?

Argent public, argent "gratuit" pris dans la poche des contribuables, theorie des choix publics, toussa.

ça n' a rien à voir avec les energies renouvelables, mais avec le fait que la demande pour l'argent public est toujours plus forte, et qu'une fois que tu ouvres un nouveau robinet d'argent public, son debit ne fait que grossir (jusqu'à ce que la source se tarisse :))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ca nous aussi que ce n'est pas viable sans.

Effectivement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.720 chauves souris tuées par an par éolienne.

Holy irony, Batman!

Posted on October 18, 2011 by Anthony Watts

Let’s see, they put up windmills to save the planet, then end up killing off endangered species, then have to limit the turbines to half days. FAIL

The Indiana bat is an endangered species and is protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

And it doesn’t seem to be limited to problems in Pennsylvania. Here’s a report about a wind farm in Canada:

Within 3/4 of a mile from the shores of Cape Vincent there already is an operational 86 turbine wind power plant on Wolfe Island, Canada. The Wolfe Island post construction bat mortality report determined that an estimated 1720 bats are killed per turbine per year. Cape Vincent can expect the same numbers because of similar habitat and shared species with Wolfe Island.

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2011/10/18/holy-irony-batman/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.720 chauves souris tuées par an par éolienne.

http://wattsupwithth…y-irony-batman/

Et pourtant, elles tournent de moins de moins :

http://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2011/10/31/les-eoliennes-allemandes-de-plus-en-plus-souvent-au-chomage-technique_1596619_3244.html

J'adore la demande de subvention supplémentaire et les soucis pour poser les lignes à haute tension entre l'allemagne du nord (où il y a les éoliennes) et l’Allemagne du sud (où il y a les consommateurs).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Et pourtant, elles tournent de moins de moins :

http://www.lemonde.f…96619_3244.html

Tiens, ça me fait penser…

Il y a un mois, je suis passé près d'Arles, où il y a 5-6 grosses éoliennes.

Sauf que ce jour-là, seules deux tournaient sur les 6, les autres étaient arrêtées.

Ah, et instinctivement, j'ai regardé les feuilles des arbres : pas le moindre brin de vent.

J'ai cru comprendre que ceux qui disaient que l'on faisait tourner les éoliennes quand il n'y a pas de vent (en consommant de l'électricité) affabulaient, mais je ne m'explique pas ce phénomène, où seul un tiers des bidules est en fonctionnement.

Et, il n'y avait vraiment pas de vent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiens, ça me fait penser…

Il y a un mois, je suis passé près d'Arles, où il y a 5-6 grosses éoliennes.

Sauf que ce jour-là, seules deux tournaient sur les 6, les autres étaient arrêtées.

Ah, et instinctivement, j'ai regardé les feuilles des arbres : pas le moindre brin de vent.

J'ai cru comprendre que ceux qui disaient que l'on faisait tourner les éoliennes quand il n'y a pas de vent (en consommant de l'électricité) affabulaient, mais je ne m'explique pas ce phénomène, où seul un tiers des bidules est en fonctionnement.

Et, il n'y avait vraiment pas de vent.

Il y a aussi une alternative, mais qui est aussi grave : ce sont des machins qui passent leur temps à casser. Donc si un petit nombre tourne sur le parc installé, alors qu'il y a du vent (même si ce n'est qu'à leur altitude), et que le reste ne tourne pas, c'est aussi que la techno n'est pas fiable…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Et pourtant, elles tournent de moins de moins :

http://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2011/10/31/les-eoliennes-allemandes-de-plus-en-plus-souvent-au-chomage-technique_1596619_3244.html

J'adore la demande de subvention supplémentaire et les soucis pour poser les lignes à haute tension entre l'allemagne du nord (où il y a les éoliennes) et l’Allemagne du sud (où il y a les consommateurs).

Charlie-z-y-dort nous a pourtant expliqué qu'il ne faut pas de nouvelles lignes à haute tension.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le fabricant français de panneaux solaires Photowatt est en redressement judiciaire : http://www.romandie.com/news/n/_Le_fabricant_de_panneaux_solaires_Photowatt_place_en_redressement_judiciaire081120111211.asp

Il semble que ce soit la seule usine en France.

Pionnier de l'énergie solaire en France, le groupe avait déposé le bilan vendredi dernier en se disant confronté à une surproduction mondiale impactant les prix et à un resserrement de ses marchés en France.
L'Etat voulait créer une filière photovoltaïque, on est la seule usine en France, ça serait bien qu'il nous aide un peu, a réagi Philippe Miklou, délégué syndical FO.

C'est vrai ça, ça se vend pas, alors faut que quelqu'un nous donne des sous sans les acheter…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C'est vrai ça, ça se vend pas, alors faut que quelqu'un nous donne des sous sans les acheter…

Encore un gros GG de l'Etat qui a fait baisser artificiellement les prix avec des primes, ces même primes s'arrêtent fin 2011. Tout le village de mes parents s'est empressé de couvrir ses toits de photovoltaique (plus d'une maison sur deux), mon cousin en a placé plus de la moitié. Il est débordé de boulot depuis mars/avril et a son carnet de commande méga ultra super rempli jusqu'au 30 décembre, de 7h du mat a 20h, WE compris, il a embauché pleins de type (en cdd, wait for it…) mais…pas une seule commande pour 2012 icon_mrgreen.gif

En gros, bye bye les CDD et faut prier le ciel que des gens vont quand même vouloir en mettre sans les primes (c'est quand même une histoire de 5 ou 7 000€ facepalm.gif).

Enfin, ça a peut-être changé depuis septembre, la dernière fois que je l'ai vu…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Tiens, ça me fait penser…

Il y a un mois, je suis passé près d'Arles, où il y a 5-6 grosses éoliennes.

Sauf que ce jour-là, seules deux tournaient sur les 6, les autres étaient arrêtées.

Ah, et instinctivement, j'ai regardé les feuilles des arbres : pas le moindre brin de vent.

J'ai cru comprendre que ceux qui disaient que l'on faisait tourner les éoliennes quand il n'y a pas de vent (en consommant de l'électricité) affabulaient, mais je ne m'explique pas ce phénomène, où seul un tiers des bidules est en fonctionnement.

Et, il n'y avait vraiment pas de vent.

juste avec un peu de raisonnement:

1- vu la masse de l'ensemble rotor-pales, si cela devait se mettre a produire de l'energie a chaque souffle de vent il faudrait une sacrée bourasque pour mettre en branle toute la masse. Il vaut dès lors mieux maintenir une vitesse minimum pour permettre d'atteindre la vitesse de rendement plus rapidement.

2- on ne stocke pas l'electricité, pas encore. Donc je presume que la dissiper en faisant tourner les eoliennes ou en faisant chauffer des radiateurs de trames TGV en été revient au meme….

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2- on ne stocke pas l'electricité, pas encore.

Pas directement. Mais remonter des masses d'eau dans un lac, ça marche pas mal quand même.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Pas directement. Mais remonter des masses d'eau dans un lac, ça marche pas mal quand même.

???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

???

Il s'agit de convertir l'énergie de l'électricité disponible à l'instant t en énergie potentielle de pesanteur.

En gros, quand ton électricité ne sert pas tu t'en sers pour remplir des barrages, et quand tu as besoin de plus d'électricité tu vides les barrages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pas directement. Mais remonter des masses d'eau dans un lac, ça marche pas mal quand même.

Il me semble avoir lu quelque part un document d'edf à ce propos, apparemment en france quasiment tous les sites permettant de faire ça sont déjà utilisés… difficile d'étendre le procédé.

Sinon le gros problème des panneaux PV actuels provient de leur 'invention' : à l'époque la nasa avait besoin de panneaux solaires pour équiper des satellites, les industriels ont réalisé ce dont la nasa avait besoin sans se préoccuper ni du prix ni des éventuelles pollutions qui pouvaient découler de leur fabrication.

Tant que ces panneaux n'étaient utilisés que sur les satellites aucun de ces deux points ne créaient de problèmes, mais quand ils ont commencé à être produits en masse…

De plus le prix est resté longtemps artificiellement bas : le silicium utilisé provenait des déchets de l'industrie électronique 'classique'. En 95 (si mes souvenirs sont bons) quelques grands chantiers PV ont été mis en route, gonflant rapidement un marché qui était à l'époque assez petit. Les producteurs ont dû s'approvisionner en silicium par la filière normale en plus des déchets industriels, et en quelques semaines le prix à la production avait quasiment doublé. Depuis le marché à grossi et la partie 'déchets' de l'approvisionnement ne représente plus que ~1/3 du silicium utilisé mais le prix des panneaux reste artificiellement bas.

En se développant le marché a fait des économies d'échelle qui ont compensé en partie, mais je doute que les prix se maintiennent au fur et à mesure que la part de 'déchets' devient minoritaire.

Les cellules à base de colorant (dye-sensitized solar cells, ou gretzel cells) permettraient probablement un prix bien plus abordable, mais la technologie semble avoir du mal à se développer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Nick de Cusa
      En quoi le nombre de blessés et de morts par unité d'énergie produite n'est-il pas un bon critère pour porter un jugement ?
    • By Nick de Cusa
      Ah, voilà un post intéressant.
      Sans aller jusqu'à de tels niveaux de miniaturisation, l'industrie automobile bossait il y a 15 ans sur des modes de propulsion turbine + électrique:
      http://www.ntnu.no/gemini/1993-dec/8b.html
      Maintenant, ça semble avoir complètement disparu de l'écran radar. Le moteur à combustion interne semble avoir remporté la victoire comme générateur:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Volt
      Pourquoi?
×
×
  • Create New...