Jump to content
shiva88

Lobotomisation Et Pénurie De Confiture

Recommended Posts

Le processus de destruction créatrice peut-il se poursuivre à l'infini ? Je connais la thèse selon laquelle lorsqu'une innovation survient et qu'elle permet d'augmenter la productivité et donc de supprimer des emplois, l'économie qui est obtenue est ensuite investie ou consommée ailleurs et crée donc de nouveaux emplois quelque part dans le circuit économique. Cependant j'ai quelques interrogations à ce sujet et je poste ces quelques textes pour nourrir la réflexion.

 

 

The robot economy in Forbes

Earlier this week, there was an op-ed in Forbes telling us that there’s no need to fear the robot economy.

However, I think the op-ed is pretty poorly reasoned. It goes something like: “Technological advancement has always bettered the human condition, and there have always been better jobs for the displaced workers, so stop worrying, morons.” I tried to find more specifics in there, but that’s really all there is to it.

The robot revolution is different than the previous economic revolutions. Robots will make unskilled and semi-skilled human labor worthless. The robot economy will produce more stuff with less human labor than ever before, but because we are married to the idea that people have to have some sort of job in a free-market economy in order to deserve to right to partake of any of the goods and services produced by society, the strange result of the robot revolution will be more people living in poverty.

The author of the op-ed writes that “mass leisure will also create other kinds of jobs, such as those devoted to entertaining and informing each other,” but the problem is that the masses will be too poor to afford leisure, and the majority of people aren’t smart enough to entertain and inform better than a robot. It will be more as Ipreviously wrote, “there will be two classes of poor: the less poor who can provide services that amuse the few super-rich, and poorer poor who have nothing valuable to contribute to the super-rich.”

 

 

 

 

 

And about the future robot economy

Tying the last post into the future robot economy:

Before the industrial revolution, we lived in a world in which we perceived there to be infinite resources, but a limited supply of labor to convert those resources into useful stuff like food and shelter.

The industrial revolution didn’t change that immediately, but there has been a progression in which labor became less and less necessary to convert the resources into useful stuff, and today we are awash in excess labor so a lot of it is being directed to “service” activities and away from the conversion of resources into useful stuff.

This will culminate with the future robot revolution, in which labor becomes irrelevant to the production of inherently valuable goods and services, and will only be used to provide the type of high-status service that a robot just can’t provide.

This also means that people will no longer be able to rise up in class based on the value of their labor, because labor will become too devalued, and we will go back to a more feudalistic type of economy in which a small minority own all of the robots and everyone else is poor.

There will be two classes of poor: the less poor who can provide services that amuse the few super-rich, and poorer poor who have nothing valuable to contribute to the super-rich.

 

 

 

Technology destroying jobs

Commenter “Tarl” provided a link to an MIT Technology Review article in which the authors explain that technology is reducing the demand for human labor, which explains why there was a large increase in “productivity” during the last decade but employment did not follow suit.

Also this:

Digital technologies tend to favor “superstars,” they point out. For example, someone who creates a computer program to automate tax preparation might earn millions or billions of dollars while eliminating the need for countless accountants.

That’s what I call a winner-take-all economy.

The authors of the article, however, have not addressed what must inevitably happen, that society has to figure out a means, other than free-market employement, for people can obtain the bounty produced by technology.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Israeli Water Engineer had a great post on this recently, “Fighting The Power Loom”. In it, he notes that the initial impact of the industrial revolution wasn’t just widespread poverty, but actual starvation. He concludes:

“How did the English solve the industrial revolution disruption? “General” Ludd and Owen’s utopian communes all failed. Trade unionism succeeded. It understood that the problem was not the higher productivity of new technologies, but the division of the fruits of progress. They stopped fighting the capital and fought for stability in employment, social security and legal protection. In the end they understood that the real issue was political power, and they took it. England is basically a worker run socialist country in the last hundred years. How will the current postindustrial revolution be solved? Also politically.”

He’s absolutely right. That doesn’t mean the solution today will be the same as back then, but it will necessarily be a political solution.

 

 

http://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/category/robots/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1)bonjour.

2)88 ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bonjour, désolé je ne me suis pas présenté, je lis régulièrement ce forum et comme je suis tombé sur ces articles je me disais que je pourrais lire des commentaires intéressants ici.

 

mon pseudo n'a pas de sens caché particulier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Premier problème avec le début de ton article, la révolution des machines agricoles a permis de diviser le nombre d'ouvriers agricoles, pourtant les ouvriers ne sont pas devenu plus pauvres ils sont allés bosser ailleurs.

Deuxièmement, les services ce n'est pas que de l'amusement, des nettoyeurs sont par exemples nécessaires pour entretenir des robots.

 

Et merde à la fin, si d'un côté on nous tanne avec la pénibilité du travail et qu'il faut accommoder les retraites en fonction de cela, je ne comprends pas pourquoi le remplacement des ouvriers de chantiers par des robots serait une perte.

Des milliers de lombaires seraient ainsi épargnées et donc les aides que l'on distribue aux pauvres types qui ont le dos en compote après 45 ans.

 

De plus il est bien évident, qu'on ne peut pas créer un robot pour n'importe quelle tâche, il faut que la tâche soit très répétitive, il n'y a pas encore de robot capable de tout faire et de penser à tout.

Les robots ne se nettoieront pas tout seuls, ne se répareront pas tout seuls ni ne se développeront tout seuls.

 

Me font toujours marrer ceux qui essaient de prédire l'avenir de cette façon là.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dès que je rentre je répond, rien que le premier article m'a donné envie de sauter au plafond.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mon pseudo n'a pas de sens caché particulier.

Innocent que tu es, dans certaines galaxies le 88, c'est pour communiquer HH, comme "Heil Hitler !".

Évidemment quand on est né en 88 ça fait un peu chier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D

 

Sur un forum politique, il vaut mieux poser la question.

 

Pour ce qui est des articles, entre futurologie et éternelle discours sur "les machines volent le travail", je pense que tout à déjà été dit.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pas convaincu. http://bigstory.ap.o...ddle-class-jobs

 

cet article là décrit comment la technologie actuelle semble détruire davantage d'emploi qu'elle n'en crée. Plutôt que de me dire "ben oui, de nouveaux emplois sont créé parce que sinon la théorie de la destruction créatrice serait fausse" j'aimerais qu'on m'indique précisément dans quels secteurs sont créés ces fameux emplois pour remplacer tout ceux qui sont détruit par les innovations technologiques.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Technological innovations have been throwing people out of jobs for centuries. But they eventually created more work, and greater wealth, than they destroyed. Ford, the author and software engineer, thinks there is reason to believe that this time will be different. He sees virtually no end to the inroads of computers into the workplace. Eventually, he says, software will threaten the livelihoods of doctors, lawyers and other highly skilled professionals.

Many economists are encouraged by history and think the gains eventually will outweigh the losses. But even they have doubts.

"What's different this time is that digital technologies show up in every corner of the economy," says McAfee, a self-described "digital optimist." ''Your tablet (computer) is just two or three years old, and it's already taken over our lives."

Peter Lindert, an economist at the University of California, Davis, says the computer is more destructive than innovations in the Industrial Revolution because the pace at which it is upending industries makes it hard for people to adapt.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

j'aimerais qu'on m'indique précisément dans quels secteurs sont créés ces fameux emplois pour remplacer tout ceux qui sont détruit par les innovations technologiques.

Impossible, certains de ces secteurs n'existent pas encore, et répondront à des besoins qu'on ne soupçonne même pas encore aujourd'hui.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personne, ou peu de monde, en 1998 ne soupçonnait les emplois qui ont été créés grâce à Internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course the robot manufacturers dispute this characterization. “While automation may transform the workforce and eliminate certain jobs, it also creates new kinds of jobs that are generally better paying and that require higher-skilled workers,” says the NYT.

That’s true, and the usual retort to this kind of Luddism. But what if, as I’ve been saying for more than a year, technology is now destroying jobs faster than it’s creating them? What if America has hit peak jobs?

Here’s your answer: that’s a good thing…in the long run. Job loss isn’t actually a problem in and of itself. Instead it’s a symptom of something much larger.

Step back a minute. Way back. What precisely is the purpose of technological innovation? Why do we want to make things faster, smarter, better, healthier, new? To get rich? OK: to generate wealth, and ultimately, eliminate scarcity. The endgame, where we’re going as a species if we don’t screw up badly and destroy ourselves or burn out all our resources before we get there, is some kind of post-scarcity society.

Will people have jobs in a post-scarcity society? No. That’s what post-scarcitymeans. They’ll have things to do, authorities, responsibilities, ambitions, callings, etc., but not jobs as we understand them. So if the endgame is a world without jobs, how will we get there? All at once? No: by a slow and inexorable decline of the total number of jobs. Today’s America is just at the edge, the very beginning, of that decline.

Trouble is, America, more than any other nation, is built around the notion that all able-bodied adults should have jobs. That’s going to be a big problem.

Paul Kedrosky recently wrote a terrific essay about what I call cultural technical debt, i.e. “organizations or technologies that persist, largely for historical reasons, not because they remain the best solution to the problem for which they were created. They are often obstacles to much better solutions.” Well, the notion that ‘jobs are how the rewards of our society are distributed, and every decent human being should have a job’ is becoming cultural technical debt.

If it’s not solved, then in the coming decades you can expect a self-perpetuating privileged elite to accrue more and more of the wealth generated by software and robots, telling themselves that they’re carrying the entire world on their backs,Ayn Rand heroes come to life, while all the lazy jobless “takers” live off the fruits of their labor. Meanwhile, as the unemployed masses grow ever more frustrated and resentful, the Occupy protests will be a mere candle flame next to the conflagrations to come. It’s hard to see how that turns into a post-scarcity society. Something big will need to change.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oui, comme l'automobile à détruit les emplois de palefrenier et l'agriculture le rôle du chasseur dans la société. So what ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La France ne recense que 35.000 robots, 3% du parc mondial. En Allemagne, le ratio s'élève à 14%. Autres géants de la robotisation industrielle : Japon, Corée du Sud, Etats-Unis, etc.

De tous ces pays, c'est bien sûr la France qui a le taux de chômage le plus faible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bonjour,

Je préfère ne pas savoir où tu vas trainer pour dégotter des articles de ce genre.

Quelques remarques essentielles:

- Une pénurie d'emploi ça n'existe pas, l'emploi n'est pas une ressource en quantité finie.

La prospérité d'une société ça se mesure en biens et services, en bien-être, ou autre chose mais pas en emploi.

- La mécanisation du travail est un processus historique continu par lequel les tâches les plus pénibles sont remplacées progressivement. L'humain s'adapte, il contrôle de plus en plus de machines, et ça ne demande pas une intelligence particulière. L'arrivée de robots ne serait qu'une étape supplémentaire.

- En tant que consommateur tout le monde bénéficie du progrès technologique, sans rien faire.

Et plus généralement, toute tentative de prévoir les problèmes économiques liées à la croissance et au progrès se sont toutes révélées ridicules a posteriori.

Les prédictions catastrophistes ont le défaut inhérent aux théories malthusiennes : elles supposent l'existence de forces inéluctables (accroissement de la population,invasion de robots) devant lesquelles l'humanité est désarmée.

Alors qu'il s'agit de signes de vitalité. (pour la population, elle augmente parce qu'elle PEUT justement être nourrie)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La France ne recense que 35.000 robots, 3% du parc mondial. En Allemagne, le ratio s'élève à 14%. Autres géants de la robotisation industrielle : Japon, Corée du Sud, Etats-Unis, etc.

De tous ces pays, c'est bien sûr la France qui a le taux de chômage le plus faible.

 

Je ne nie pas que le taux de chômage puisse être lié à d'autres éléments que le peak job du aux révolutions technologiques. ça ne veut pas dire que le phénomène n'existe pas.

 

Les USA connaisse aussi un taux de chômage très élevé, et le Japon et l'Allemagne ont une part de population active moins importante que la France.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The robot revolution is different than the previous economic revolutions. Robots will make unskilled and semi-skilled human labor worthless.

En quoi est-ce un mal ? 

Comme le dit Noob, si on peut épargner quelques dos, c'est bien non ?

Et c'est pas différent des autres révolutions. La brouette a rendu le porteur de pierre inutile. On peut trouver plein d'exemples à la con comme ça.

En plus, avec l'accès plus facile à l'information et au savoir (Internet, institut Khan, etc...), il est plus facile que jamais de devenir "expert" dans un sujet, de s'instruire et de pouvoir accéder à un travail moins unskilled.

 

 

there will be two classes of poor: the less poor who can provide services that amuse the few super-rich, and poorer poor who have nothing valuable to contribute to the super-rich

Mais quel abruti le type qui écrit ça. Quelle suffisance. Je trouve rien à contredire puisqu'il ne dit rien ; il prophétise un avenir @film-pourri-d'Hollywood (Elysium par exemple) et en déduit, dans sa grand sagesse (lol), les mêmes conneries que ce qu'un Montebourg pourrait sortir (et a sorti).

C'est minable et ça démontre juste une fermeture d'esprit assez légendaire.

 

 

there has been a progression in which labor became less and less necessary to convert the resources into useful stuff, and today we are awash in excess labor so a lot of it is being directed to “service” activities and away from the conversion of resources into useful stuff

Les "services" sont des "useful stuff". Alors non, un service ça ne se mange pas. Mais la poterie non plus, et pourtant on en fait depuis des millénaires.

Puis l'argument de base est un peu con encore une fois. On a trop de gens, pas assez de travail, alors on envoie ce trop-plein dans les services. C'est une causalité totalement fausse.

 

 

labor becomes irrelevant to the production of inherently valuable goods and services, and will only be used to provide the type of high-status service that a robot just can’t provide.

Alors alors...

Tous les métiers hôteliers (chasseur, etc...), la restauration (oh ne vous inquiétez pas, même si un robot peut en théorie faire serveur, il y aura toujours une grande niche pour les humains), les douanes, la police, l'infanterie... la liste est longue.

 

This also means that people will no longer be able to rise up in class based on the value of their labor, because labor will become too devalued, and we will go back to a more feudalistic type of economy in which a small minority own all of the robots and everyone else is poor.

 

Encore une fois, une prophétie à la con. 

 

Digital technologies tend to favor “superstars,” they point out. For example, someone who creates a computer program to automate tax preparation might earn millions or billions of dollars while eliminating the need for countless accountants.

That’s what I call a winner-take-all economy.

The authors of the article, however, have not addressed what must inevitably happen, that society has to figure out a means, other than free-market employement, for people can obtain the bounty produced by technology.

Maudit Graham Bell. Son téléphone a détruit tellement de télégraphes. Méchant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...ça ne veut pas dire que le phénomène n'existe pas.

 

Quel phénomène ?

Avec le taux de mécanisation et de robotisation qu'a connu l'Occident depuis le début du 19e siècle, s'il fallait écouter les gugusses, il ne devrait plus rester un seul emploi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aussi il y a de vrai escroqueries dans ton article, en parlant du claude computing, ils parlent des milliers de jobs qui disparaissent juste parce que maintenant on peut louer ces machines.

Sauf que bordel ces machines ne se montent pas toute seule chez Amazon ou Google, c'est un travail titanesque de mettre à disposition autant de machines avec un telle qualité de service.

 

Mais la plus grosse escroquerie de l'article c'est de considérer que les USA sont sortis de la crise en 2009 et que malgré cela les jobs ne sont pas de retour. Ergo la technologie est responsable de toute ces pertes.

Comme si lorsqu'on passe d'un signe négatif à positif pouf plus de récession donc la croissance des jobs devrait repartir. Non si on croit à 0.1 % c'est toujours bien en dessous du taux naturel de croissance et donc que relativement la richesse par tête diminue paye ton retour de croissance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Avec le taux de mécanisation et de robotisation qu'a connu l'Occident depuis le début du 19e siècle, s'il fallait écouter les gugusses, il ne devrait plus rester un seul emploi.

But zis time it is differenteu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Là, c'est Skynet, des robots intelligents. On est foutu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Là, c'est Skynet, des robots intelligents. On est foutu.

Ils vont bien avoir la haine ces robots super-intelligents quand ils verront qu'ils ont été construits pour passer le balai et faire les vitres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oui mais ils nous transformeront en esclave et fumeront des cigares pendant que les Humains nettoierons les vitres à leurs tours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...