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7 projets rejetés (sur 221) pour l'Opéra de Sydney (1956) :

 

https://www.archdaily.com/911580/7-rejected-proposals-for-sydney-opera-house?fbclid=IwAR1RT2QFyTDP2NAsqo1MLUgA4tvaF3_po7RstKP0fMQbHYWznyYo1k4ZjR4

 

En l'absence d'information sur les intérieurs et les extérieurs rapprochés, j'ai tendance à préférer le projet choisi pour l'impression d'envol et de légèreté qu'il donne. (Mais c'est peut-être un réflexe guidé par l'habitude d'avoir souvent vu l'Opéra de Sydney et jamais les autres projets qui semblent donc plus étranges à mes yeux.)

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il y a 18 minutes, Nathalie MP a dit :

7 projets rejetés (sur 221) pour l'Opéra de Sydney (1956) :

 

https://www.archdaily.com/911580/7-rejected-proposals-for-sydney-opera-house?fbclid=IwAR1RT2QFyTDP2NAsqo1MLUgA4tvaF3_po7RstKP0fMQbHYWznyYo1k4ZjR4

 

En l'absence d'information sur les intérieurs et les extérieurs rapprochés, j'ai tendance à préférer le projet choisi pour l'impression d'envol et de légèreté qu'il donne. (Mais c'est peut-être un réflexe guidé par l'habitude d'avoir souvent vu l'Opéra de Sydney et jamais les autres projets qui semblent donc plus étranges à mes yeux.)

Oui, vu comme ca, ils ont fait le bon choix. le projet de Philadelphia Collaborative Group n'est pas mal non plus.

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  • 2 weeks later...

e8291755e787529558de1f3cb93104f7dde69566

 

https://www.archpaper.com/2020/06/nordic-office-of-architecture-completes-spiraling-wetlands-tower-in-nanchang/

 

"Nordic — Office of Architecture completes spiraling wetlands tower in Nanchang"

 

Citation

Bookending the sinuous, squat volume is the highly conspicuous pièce de résistance of Nanchang Waves: A corkscrewing observation tower that rises 115 feet above the surrounding wetlands and, per the architects, “represents the blueprint for future living and the new spirit of the city.” According to the project’s structural engineer Ramboll Group, the tower’s “UFO-like” observation deck, accessible via a 23 foot wide double-helix spiral staircase, spans just over 7,000 square feet.

 

Je ne sais pas, pour moi souvent les bâtiments futuristes montrent l'extravagance de chaque époque, mais ils semblent contemporains de cette époque, et dans ce cas, il semble très daté.

 

Et normalement l'apparence de "daté" se manifeste quelques années après et n'est pas le cas ici. C'est "daté" maintenant.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Rincevent said:

On n'a pas de fil "Architecture et choses hideuses" ?

Habituellement le fil "Paris sous Hidalgo" est le plus adapté. 

  • Haha 3
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il y a 3 minutes, Sekonda a dit :

Habituellement le fil "Paris sous Hidalgo" est le plus adapté. 

I see (and approve) what you did here. :D Mais l'influence méphitique d'Hidalgo ne va pas jusqu'à Édimbourg, non plus.

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Il y a 16 heures, Hugh a dit :

Hotel Fairmont Maldives - Sirru Fen Fushi


C’est vraiment très beau mais j’ai du mal à imaginer l’ampleur des travaux d’entretien avec l’eau de mer qui doit entrer par baquets lors des tempêtes, les arbres(!) dans la piscine.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/why-is-modern-architecture-so-ugly

 

"Why is modern architecture so ugly?"

 

N'est pas le texte intégral:

 

Citation

In Chesham and Amersham last week, Tory voters punished the government, not only for building on greenfield sites, but for allowing the construction of too many ugly, badly designed buildings. The British public are fed up with modern architecture. Despite polls that prove this time and time again, architects simply ignore people’s views. Indeed, if the public has the temerity to criticise their latest works, there is uproar

 

The chasm is widening between what people want to enhance our cities, our countryside and our lives and what architects are giving us.

 

During the pandemic, the government announced a White Paper, backed up in the Queen’s Speech, which pledges more house-building. Ominously, it included a new algorithm (since abandoned) telling councils how many homes to build, with the Cotswolds a particular target. 

 

 An architect is set to build 2,350 soulless new homes on its fields on the edge of Cirencester, increasing the size of the overbuilt market town by as much as 40 per cent. 

 

One look at Dezeen, the international modernist architects’ favourite website, reveals the mismatch between their concept of beauty and the public’s. The plans for Bristol University’s new library have been highlighted by the site as a shining example of civic architecture. Yet these plans were condemned by local people as ‘an atrocity, a new unwanted landmark… absolutely horrific’. Despite this, in March the councillors voted the building through 6-4.

Take two more examples of monstrous new developments forced through by building planners and councillors who rode roughshod over community concerns. First, a nine-storey glass and steel development in Old Brompton Road. Despite carefully argued criticisms and protests, the community’s feedback was totally ignored by Kensington and Chelsea council. 

 

Then there is the £1.3 billion Olympia London development, which will sprawl across a historic site of 14 acres. The landmark exhibition centre is affectionately known as the home of the International Horse Show and Spirit of Christmas Fair, among many other annual events. Yet it is being transformed into a gigantic eyesore, comprising a multi-storey office block, hotel, concert hall, bars, restaurants, theatre and shopping mall, with poorly thought-through infrastructure that will bring local traffic to a standstill.

 

But Britain does have talented modern classically trained architects and planners. Now is their time to come to the forefront and for building planners to employ them. After Sir Roger Scruton’s death, Nicholas Boys Smith has written widely on planning, and the proven links between good design and wellbeing. If the pandemic has taught us anything it’s that collaboration makes for a happier, smoother-running society. It is therefore disturbing to be emerging from lockdown into a world in which architects ignore residents’ wishes and needs, treating them as lab rats in their experimental building schemes while they rake in the money.

 

Intéressant.

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