Jump to content
Mal

Le cash interdit

Recommended Posts

Je tente ma chance ici...

 

Il y a-t-il ici un topic sur "la guerre contre le cash" (war on cash).

 

De plus en plus de pays/institutions mettent en place des freins à l'utilisation de l'argent liquide...

 

Merci. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non, mais je peux t'en creer un si tu le souhaites (tupourra cree tes propres sujets quand tu aura atteint 100 messages)

 

Par contre je compte sur toi pour y apporter du contenue de qualite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On peut commencer par cet excellent article de Joseph T. Salerno publie sur le site du Mises Institute : 

https://mises.org/library/international-war-cash
 

Using Legal Tender Laws Against the State?


The relentless war against cash payments waged by governments worldwide has perhaps gone furthest in Scandinavia. The ostensible reason given by our rulers for suppressing cash is to keep society safe from terrorists, tax evaders, money launderers, drug cartels and sundry other villains, real or imagined. But the actual aim of the recent flood of laws rendering cash transactions less convenient or limiting or even prohibiting them is to force the public at large to make payments through the financial system in order to prop up the unstable fractional-reserve banks and, more importantly, to expand the ability of governments to spy on and keep track of their citizens’ most private financial dealings. One ingenious friend from Norway has fought to protect his right to use cash by invoking his government’s own legal tender laws against it. Here is his story in his own words:

About a month ago I had a doctor’s appointment at the city’s health services emergency ward (government institution).
When leaving, I asked to pay cash. I was told that the cashier’s desk was closed, that I would be invoiced, and that they generally did not accept cash. I reminded the nurse(?) on duty about legal tender.
When I got the invoice, I called accounting at the ward. I told the accountant that I wished to pay cash. I was told that was not possible. I asked if she knew about legal tender, referring to the specific legislation. She went completely defensive, as I clearly perceived it. She even claimed that legal issues with the no-cash arrangement had been dealt with. I said I would file a written complaint.
So I did. I called in a few days later to check if the complaint had been received, which she could confirm. Now the accountant was apparently more interested in discussing the issue.
Yesterday, I got the written response. I was given the opportunity to pay cash in this one case if I brought the exact amount. Moreover, no changes in the general arrangements would be made. Today, I made the payment in cash.
Why did they do this? I would suspect that they figured they had a weak legal case, that they were dealing with someone who apparently wasn’t going to give up, and that allowing it in this case would avoid having to deal with someone with a formal legal interest in challenging their anti-cash system, the alternatives being changing their system voluntarily and fighting an administrative complaint case — or even worse, a court case.
Of course, things would be much better if we weren’t forced to use this fiat money. However, it is reasonable to expect government institutions to comply with the government’s own legal tender regulations.


Sweden’s War on Cash Runs Into a Wall — and a Heroic Bank


The war on cash in Sweden may be stalling. The anti-cash movement has been vigorously promoted by major Swedish commercial banks as well as the Riksbank, the Swedish central bank. In fact, for three of the four major Swedish banks combined, 530 of their 780 office no longer accept or pay out cash. In the case of the Nordea Bank, 200 of its 300 branches are now cashless, and three-quarters of Swedbank’s branches no longer handle cash. As Peter Borsos, a spokesman for Swedbank, freely admits, his bank is working “actively to reduce the [amount] of cash in society.” The reasons for this push toward a cashless society, of course, have nothing to do with pumping up earnings from bank card fees or, more important, freeing fractional-reserve banks from the constraints of bank runs. No, according to Borsos, the reasons are the environment, cost, and security: ”We ourselves emit 700 tons of carbon dioxide by cash transport. It costs society 11 billion per year. And cash helps robberies everywhere.” Hans Jacobson, head of Nordea Bank, argues similarly: “Our mission is to make people understand the point of cards, cards are more secure than cash.”
Fortunately, it seems that the Swedish people are not falling for the anti-cash propaganda spewed by private bankers and Riksbank officials and are resisting the trend toward a cashless economy. It is reported that last year the value of cash transactions in Sweden were 99 billion krona which represented only a marginal decrease from ten years ago. And small shops continue to do one-third to one-half of their business in cash. Furthermore a study of bank customers satisfaction released by the Swedish Quality Index in October 2012, indicated that the satisfaction index was pulled down among customers of Swedbank, Nordea and SEB by their policy of eliminating cash transactions at their bank branches. Even more heartening is the fact that Handelsbanken, the largest bank in Sweden, is committed to serving consumers who demand cash. As Kai Jokitulppo, head of private services at Handelsbanken, puts it:

“As long as we know that our customers are asking for cash, it is important that we as a bank [are] providing it. . . . We see places where other banks are taking other decisions, we get customers from them and positive response.”

Fewer then 10 of Handelsbanken’s 461 branches currently do not handle cash and the bank’s goal is to have cash in every branch by the first quarter of 2013.

France Ratchets Up the War on Cash

France’s state auditing bureau, Cour des Comptes, informed the French government that it was “dreaming” in forecasting that the French economy would grow this year by 0.8 percent, which would enable it to meet its budget deficit target of 3 percent of GDP. The bureau told French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault that a growth rate of 0.3 percent was more like it, which would not be sufficient to meet the deficit reduction target. This was the case despite–or more likely because of–the fact that a broad based tax increase had just been imposed that would extract another €32 billion euros from overburdened French businesses and households this year. So would a desperate Ayrault finally open his eyes to economic reality and slash the budget of the bureaucratic and bloated French State, a budget that is liberally larded with fascistic corporate welfare subsidies and bailouts? No way, no how. Instead Ayrault convened a meeting of the National Anti-Fraud Committee to crack down on tax cheats and presided over it himself–”A first for a head of government,” he crowed.
Tax fraud in France has been estimated to be in the range of €60 to €80 billion annually. Buried in Ayrault’s proposal to crack down on tax cheats and further squeeze more revenue from its “fiscal residents”–those citizens and foreigners who have not been driven into part-time exile to escape French taxes–is a draconian provision that would lower the maximum cash payment per transaction from €3,000 to €1,000. Under the new limit a French citizen would not even be able to buy a used car for cash. The provision would not apply, however, to citizens and foreigners wealthy and savvy enough to have placed their income beyond the clutches of the rapacious French State by becoming fiscal residents of other countries. They would be subject to a limit of €10,000 per purchase in cash, down from the current limit of €15,000 per purchase. This may come to be called the Depardieu exception because French actor Gerard Depardieu recently caused a public stir by obtaining a Russian passport in order to take advantage of Russia’s flat-rate income tax of 13 percent.
One commentator perceptively summed up the inextricable link between the war on cash and the war on personal liberties :

With this law, the French government will be able to tighten the vise on its people one more turn, restricting their freedom of choice (how to pay), wiping out any privacy in those transactions, and imposing another layer of government control. Once people have gotten used to the €1,000 limit—based on the great principle of incrementalism with which restrictions of freedom come to pass in democracies—the vise will be tightened further, until the government can document every purchase made by “fiscal residents.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oui mais les filles c'est bien joli tout ca, mais le cash est malpratique, coute cher a manipuler, a produire, a une valeur intrinseque en decalage avec sa valeur legale, etc etc.Ce n'est pas uniquement le gouvernement qui veut notre mal, il veut toujours notre mal. C'est surtout que le cash c'etait pratique avant qu'on invente encore plus pratique.

 

D'autre part je me demande meme si a la rigueur ca ne serait pas un bon plan pour les porteurs de metaux precieux.

Un frein a vos achats illegaux, je ne pense pas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oui mais les filles c'est bien joli tout ca, mais le cash est malpratique, coute cher a manipuler, a produire, a une valeur intrinseque en decalage avec sa valeur legale, etc etc.Ce n'est pas uniquement le gouvernement qui veut notre mal, il veut toujours notre mal. C'est surtout que le cash c'etait pratique avant qu'on invente encore plus pratique.

Mmhh, la valeur intrinsèque ça n'existe pas hors des titres financiers de toute façon, c'est une resucée de la valeur-travail

OK pour abandonner le cash mais seulement si le gouvernement laisse se développer le encore plus pratique. Et là on a un gouvernement en France qui veut réguler à mort les crypto (par exemple) qui ne sont même pas considérées comme un un moyen de paiement ou un instrument financier. A partir du moment où on a pas le droit de payer sa voiture ou son employé en BTC ou via Apple et Android pay, il ne faut surtout pas laisser l'Etat gagner du terrain sur le cash "classique".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ah non mais en fRance vous etes mal de toute facon, il n'y a rigoureusement aucun sursaut pour repondre aux innombrables brimades dont est responsable l'etat en ce moment meme.Vous allez perdre votre cash, mais pas tout de suite.

Pour l'instant je pense que c'est vraiment une logique de praticite.OUI l'etat a encore l'obligation d'accepter le cash, mais c'est aussi vrai que partout ou les cartes sont plus pratiques et plus rapides les administrations essayent de s'en servir.

Par exemple a Montreal les restaurants et commerces de bouffe a emporter ont commence a implementer le pourboire 15% dans les machines a carte.Tout simplement parce que de moins en moins de gens veulent utiliser du cash, et calculer 15% de tete c'est chiant.

Ce que vous voyez pour le moment c'est une victoire des moyens les plus pratiques.Vous craignez un abus de la part de l'etat mais bien sur qu'il va avoir lieu, bien sur que vous n'y pouvez rien a moins d'une lutte legale acharnee et supportee par des lobbies puissants.

 

Et comme je dis, dans ce cas, entre des moyens electroniques illegaux et chauds a mettre en oeuvre il y a l'or, largent, les metaux precieux, les diamants.Retour aux sources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Mmhh, la valeur intrinsèque ça n'existe pas hors des titres financiers de toute façon, c'est une resucée de la valeur-travail

 

Ça n'existe pas non plus pour les titres financiers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ooooh je sens partir un debat passionnant (not) sur la valeur intrinseque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

 

Non mais oui, Bill Bonner il est francaoui, stévident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ça n'existe pas non plus pour les titres financiers.

 

Je pensais à la VMI, mais après vérification étymologique, ça rentre dans la même catégorie que le reste, Ce n'est cohérent que dans un système comptable (actif estimé au prix d'entrée, retranché de la dette associée).

 

My bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non mais oui, Bill Bonner il est francaoui, stévident.

 

non et ca change quoi ? concretement ?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oui mais les filles c'est bien joli tout ca, mais le cash est malpratique

 

Je vois pas en quoi c'est malpratique, ça prend un peu de place mais c'est tout. 

 

Que ça soit légèrement moins pratique n'est pas la raison de la disparition du cash en France, la raison c'est que tu ne peux plus utiliser ton cash pour grand chose a part pour faire les courses.

Que toutes nos transactions soit archivées et accessibles par l’état c'est a mon avis un problème important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pourboire automatique?

Qu'est ce que c'est que ce truc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Il est usuel de donner un pourboire dans les restaurants en Amérique du Nord (ainsi que certains autres services). 15% est considéré comme normal, et tu peux ensuite ajuster en fonction de la qualité du service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ah non mais en fRance vous etes mal de toute facon, il n'y a rigoureusement aucun sursaut pour repondre aux innombrables brimades dont est responsable l'etat en ce moment meme.Vous allez perdre votre cash, mais pas tout de suite.

Pour l'instant je pense que c'est vraiment une logique de praticite.OUI l'etat a encore l'obligation d'accepter le cash, mais c'est aussi vrai que partout ou les cartes sont plus pratiques et plus rapides les administrations essayent de s'en servir.

Par exemple a Montreal les restaurants et commerces de bouffe a emporter ont commence a implementer le pourboire 15% dans les machines a carte.Tout simplement parce que de moins en moins de gens veulent utiliser du cash, et calculer 15% de tete c'est chiant.

Ce que vous voyez pour le moment c'est une victoire des moyens les plus pratiques.Vous craignez un abus de la part de l'etat mais bien sur qu'il va avoir lieu, bien sur que vous n'y pouvez rien a moins d'une lutte legale acharnee et supportee par des lobbies puissants.

 

Et comme je dis, dans ce cas, entre des moyens electroniques illegaux et chauds a mettre en oeuvre il y a l'or, largent, les metaux precieux, les diamants.Retour aux sources.

 

D'ailleurs ils se gavent avec la machine parce qu'elle calcule le tip sur le montant TTC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Il est usuel de donner un pourboire dans les restaurants en Amérique du Nord (ainsi que certains autres services). 15% est considéré comme normal, et tu peux ensuite ajuster en fonction de la qualité du service.

Je savais. Mais je trouve assez hallucinant de considérer le pourboire automatique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quand tu achètes un service tu paies automatiquement non ? Ben là c'est pareil. Les serveurs ne bossent pas gratos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je savais. Mais je trouve assez hallucinant de considérer le pourboire automatique.

 

Je ne suis pas fan du principe non plus, mais vu que les Américains considèrent déjà ça comme quasi-obligatoire, je ne suis pas sûr qu'il y aurait une grosse résistance.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quand le serveur est payé 2$ de l'heure + pourboire, à moins d'être un clodo (et encore), faut être sacrément europeanouille pour ne pas tipper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je savais. Mais je trouve assez hallucinant de considérer le pourboire automatique.

 

Ben c'est à dire qu'en France le pourboire est vraiment automatique (inclus dans le salaire), alors qu'aux staytes il l'est... presque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Et t'as intérêt à payer un pourboire si tu préfères que ta nourriture soit sans salive...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tu paie à la fin du repas. Bon après, si tu reviens le lendemain avec le même serveur forcément...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je savais. Mais je trouve assez hallucinant de considérer le pourboire automatique.

 

tu n'es pas oblige de le payer, tu entres le pourcentage que tu veux ou il y a l'option 'no tip'.C'est assez discret en fait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Et t'as intérêt à payer un pourboire si tu préfères que ta nourriture soit sans salive...

 

c'est des conneries.Si le serviceest mauvais pourquoi revenir ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je vois pas en quoi c'est malpratique, ça prend un peu de place mais c'est tout. 

 

Que ça soit légèrement moins pratique n'est pas la raison de la disparition du cash en France, la raison c'est que tu ne peux plus utiliser ton cash pour grand chose a part pour faire les courses.

Que toutes nos transactions soit archivées et accessibles par l’état c'est a mon avis un problème important.

 

Ca te parait etre un changement parce que tu ne realises pas que tout es deja super extra facile a tracker en particulier a l'egard les gens qui ne sont pas des criminels professionnels.

Rien ne change vraiment, c'est du total fear-mongering, totalement incongru apres l'apathie mondiale massive post-Chypre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C'est pas vrai, par exemple le cash permet encore de faire un peu de black, sans être un criminel professionnel, et c'est difficile a traquer.

 

Quand tu paye quelqu'un en cash tu lui donne la possibilité de ne pas donner 50% du fruit de son travail a l’état. En faisant ça tu réduis les dépenses de l’état, tu participe au bien être de ton pays et tu es donc un bon citoyen.

 

Payer par carte en revanche, c'est être méchant.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quand le serveur est payé 2$ de l'heure + pourboire, à moins d'être un clodo (et encore), faut être sacrément europeanouille pour ne pas tipper.

 

Exactement.

Par contre je donne pas un pourcentage, le service d'un repas a 100 euros vaut plus que celui d'un repas a 2 euros, mais pas 50 fois plus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Payer par carte, c'est être méchant.

Mais c'est tellement pratique.

Par contre payer en chèque c'est du WTF de franchouille

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...