Jump to content

Free Private Cities


Extremo

Recommended Posts

Je savais pas trop où le poster mais ça me semble plutôt intéressant :

 

 

 

https://freeprivatecities.com/

 

https://fee.org/articles/private-cities-a-path-to-liberty/

Citation

Private Cities : A Path to Liberty

Let us analyze the market for governance: states exist, at least in part, because there is demand for them. A functioning state offers a stable framework of law and order, which enables the coexistence and interaction of a large number of people. This is so attractive that most people are willing to accept significant limitations on their personal freedom in exchange. Probably even most North Koreans would prefer staying in their country compared to living free but alone as a Robinson Crusoe on a remote island. Humans are social animals.

However, if you could offer the services of a state and also avoid its disadvantages, you would have created a better product. But after decades of political activity, I have come to the conclusion that real liberty, in the sense of voluntariness and self-determination, can’t be achieved by tinkering with existing states through the democratic process. There is simply not enough demand for these values at the moment.

However, someone could offer this as a niche product for interested parties. It might be possible for private companies to provide all of the necessary services that government normally monopolizes. I want to start such a company.

Private Cities

All that we know from the free market could be applied to what I call the “market of living together”: voluntary exchange (including the right to reject any offer), competition between products, and the resulting diversity of the product range. A “government services provider” could offer a specific model of living together within a defined territory and only the ones who like the offer settle there. Such offers have to be attractive — otherwise there will be no customers.

This is the idea of a private city: a voluntary, for-profit, private enterprise that offers protection for life, liberty, and property in a given territory — better, cheaper, and freer than existing state models. Residence would depend on a predefined contractual relationship between residents and the operator. In case there is a conflict about the interpretation of the contract, there will be independent arbitration.

Private cities are not meant as a retreat for the rich. Run properly, they would develop along the lines of Hong Kong, offering opportunities to rich and poor alike. New residents who are willing to work but without means could negotiate a deferral of their payment obligations, and employers seeking a workforce could take over their contractual payment obligations.

The incentive for the operator of a private city would be profit: offering an attractive product at the right price. This would likely include public goods, such as a clean environment, police, and fire protection, as well as some infrastructure and social rules. But the operator’s main service is to ensure that the free order is not disturbed and that residents’ life and property are secure.

In practice, the operator can only guarantee this if he or she can control who is coming (prevention) and is entitled to throw out disrupters (reaction). For everything beyond this framework, there are private entrepreneurs, insurance, and civil society groups. Of course, all activity ends where the rights of others are infringed. Other than that, the proper corrective is competition and demand.

Order and Exit

Will the threat of competition bring sufficient protection to the residents? Consider this: the Principality of Monaco is a constitutional monarchy. It concedes zero political participation rights for residents without Monegasque citizenship — some 80 percent of the population, including myself. Nevertheless, there are far more applicants for residency than the small housing market of this tiny place (two square kilometers) may take.

Why is this so? Three reasons: there are no direct taxes in Monaco for individuals; it is extremely secure; and the government leaves you alone. If Monaco changed this, people would just move away to other jurisdictions. Thus, despite the prince’s formal position of great power, competition with other jurisdictions — not separation of powers, not a constitution, and not voting — ensures the residents' freedom.

Accordingly, there is also no need for parliaments. Rather, such representative bodies are a constant danger to liberty, since special interest groups inevitably hijack and mutate them into self-service stores for the political class. Unfortunately, the rule of law does not provide adequate protection against this tendency in contemporary Western societies. If laws or constitutions are standing in the way, they will be quickly modified or interpreted in a politically convenient way.

Competition has been proven as the only effective method in human history for limitation of power. In a private city, contract and arbitration are efficient tools in favor of the residents. But ultimately, it is competition and the possibility of a speedy exit that guarantee that the operator remains a service provider and does not become a dictator.

A private city is not a utopian, constructivist idea. Instead, it is simply a known business model applied to another sector, the market of living together. In essence, the operator is a mere service provider, establishing and maintaining the framework within which the society can develop, open-ended, with no predefined goal.

The only permanent requirement in favor of freedom and self-determination is the contract with the operator. Only this contract can create mandatory obligations. For example, residents can agree on establishing a council. But even if 99 percent of the residents support the idea and voluntarily submit to the council’s decisions, this body has no right to impose their ideas on the remaining 1 percent. And this is the crucial point, which failed regularly in past and present systems: a reliable guarantee of individual liberty.

Where to Begin

In order to start this project, autonomy from existing sovereignties must be secured. It need not entail complete territorial independence, but it must include the right to regulate the city’s internal affairs. The establishment of a private city therefore requires first an agreement with an existing state. The parent state grants the operator the right to establish a private city and to set its own rules within a defined territory, ideally with access to the sea and formerly unincorporated.

Existing states can be sold on this concept when they can expect to reap benefits from it. The quasi-city states of Hong Kong, Singapore, and Monaco have a cordon of densely populated and affluent areas adjacent to their borders. These areas are part of the parent states and their residents pay taxes to the mother country. Now, if such structures are formed around a previously underdeveloped or unpopulated area, this is a gain for the parent state. Negotiating with a government to surrender partial sovereignty is certainly no easy task, but it is in my view more promising than attempts to “change the system from within.”

Private cities are much more than just a nice idea for a few people on the margins. They have the potential to subject existing states to creative destruction. If private cities are developed across the world, they will put states under considerable pressure to change their systems towards more freedom, or else they may lose subjects and revenue.

It is precisely this positive effect of competition that has been lacking in the state market to date. Not all private cities need conform to my own ideal rules. Specialized cities offering social security or catering to specific religious or ideological concerns are conceivable. Within this framework, even socialists would be free to try to prove that their system done properly really does work. But this time one thing is different: others do not have to suffer from this (or any other) social experiment. The superstructure of voluntary association allows many different systems to flourish. Given voluntary participation, everything is possible.

This simple rule has the potential to disarm and transform even a totalitarian ideology into just one product among many. I firmly believe that private cities or similar autonomous regions, such as charter cities, Seasteading, or LEAP-zones, are inevitable. People of all social and economic groups will not forever agree to be looted, bullied, and patronized by the political class, without ever having a meaningful choice. Private cities are a peaceful, voluntary alternative that can transform our societies without revolution or violence — or even majority consensus. My guess: we will see the first private city within the next ten years. I hope to see you there.

 

Link to comment
Si je souhaite ne pas payer et en échange ne pas bénéficier des services, c'est possible ? Si "non" est la réponse à cette question, j'ai du mal à voir la différence avec une mairie normale.

Même si tu n'as pas le "choix" de plaque ou non pour les services fournis par la ville, tu as beaucoup plus de concurrence, ce qui te bénéficiera au final.
Link to comment
il y a 9 minutes, Mister_Bretzel a dit :

Désolé du double post mais je peux pas éditer le précédent.

 

Si on peut choisir de payer les services à l'acte au lieu d'une souscription annuelle, par exemple XX€ pour un dépôt de plainte chez les flics, ça revient finalement à l'anarcapie habituelle.

 

Si tu as choisi d'être adhérent à la ville tu dois payer la souscription annuelle, un peu comme quand tu t'inscris à un club.


La différence avec une mairie habituelle c'est qu'à partir du moment où tu es résident de la ville c'est que tu as explicitement consenti à ses règles en signant un contrat avec l'opérateur, une sorte de Constitution librement consentie, contrairement à ce qui est le cas dans le contexte étatique où le soi-disant contrat social n'a jamais été signé par qui que ce soit. Et bien que la ville aurait une juridiction qui serait là en dernier ressort, il n'y aurait pas non plus de monopole de la justice, le citoyen serait parfaitement libre d'aller voir ailleurs tout en restant membre de la ville, c'est du moins comme ça que je l'ai compris (cf la seconde vidéo à partir de 9:30).

 

Plus d'informations ici : https://www.wikiberal.org/wiki/Villes_privées

 

Et puis il y a aussi la compétition bien sûr, comme le souligne ts69.

  • Yea 2
Link to comment
25 minutes ago, Extremo said:

 

Si tu as choisi d'être adhérent à la ville tu dois payer la souscription annuelle, un peu comme quand tu t'inscris à un club.


La différence avec une mairie habituelle c'est qu'à partir du moment où tu es résident de la ville c'est que tu as explicitement consenti à ses règles en signant un contrat avec l'opérateur, une sorte de Constitution librement consentie, contrairement à ce qui est le cas dans le contexte étatique où le soi-disant contrat social n'a jamais été signé par qui que ce soit. Et bien que la ville aurait une juridiction qui serait là en dernier ressort, il n'y aurait pas non plus de monopole de la justice, le citoyen serait parfaitement libre d'aller voir ailleurs tout en restant membre de la ville, c'est du moins comme ça que je l'ai compris (cf la seconde vidéo à partir de 9:30).

 

Plus d'informations ici : https://www.wikiberal.org/wiki/Villes_privées

 

Et puis il y a aussi la compétition bien sûr, comme le souligne ts69.

 

 

Le cas décrit dans le texte original c'est juste que ce propriétaire du terrain a sa propre entreprise pour gérer les fonctions régaliennes et fait payer une souscription annuelle. C'est juste une seule façon de faire une ville privée, qui est incluse dans l'anarcapie habituelle mais qui garde un aspect institutionnel, même privé, pour rassurer ceux ne sachant pas penser en dehors de l'Etat.

 

L'initiative est très bien, mais pour qui a l'habitude de penser en mode libéral, ce n'est pas une grande nouveauté.

 

Et la compétition s'exprime comment ? Sur une ville donnée, les citoyens peuvent bouter le prestataire hors de la ville pour un choisir un autre ? Ca suppose un processus démocratique où la minorité n'a pas son mot à dire, et on retombe dans le travers qu'on voulait éviter. La seule concurrence que je vois dans ce modèle c'est avec la ville voisine : voter avec ses pieds.

 

Reason TV a approché le sujet avec ce reportage

 

 

 

Link to comment
1 hour ago, Mister_Bretzel said:

Si je souhaite ne pas payer et en échange ne pas bénéficier des services, c'est possible ? Si "non" est la réponse à cette question, j'ai du mal à voir la différence avec une mairie normale.

Dans une ville normale la constitution du pays s'applique. Il me semble que ca fait une difference.

  • Yea 1
Link to comment
Il y a 2 heures, Mister_Bretzel a dit :

La seule concurrence que je vois dans ce modèle c'est avec la ville voisine : voter avec ses pieds.

 

Oui c'est exactement comme ça que la compétition s'exprime : le vote avec les pieds. Si l'opérateur ne fournit pas un service satisfaisant le citoyen peut bouger ailleurs, il aura infiniment plus de choix que dans le contexte étatique.

 

Il y a 2 heures, Escondido a dit :

Dans une ville normale la constitution du pays s'applique. Il me semble que ca fait une difference.

 

Ca plus le fait que la Constitution soit librement consentie et que le citoyen l'ait explicitement signée avant de s'installer dans la ville, c'est ce qui fait la différence entre une ville privée et une cité-Etat, dans le premier cas on est en situation d'anarcapie si la ville privée réussi à obtenir son indépendance totale, tandis que dans le second cas on est au mieux en minarchie.

  • Yea 2
Link to comment
Il y a 3 heures, Extremo a dit :

La différence avec une mairie habituelle c'est qu'à partir du moment où tu es résident de la ville c'est que tu as explicitement consenti à ses règles en signant un contrat avec l'opérateur, une sorte de Constitution librement consentie, contrairement à ce qui est le cas dans le contexte étatique où le soi-disant contrat social n'a jamais été signé par qui que ce soit.

 

Et quand un enfant devient adulte ?

Je ne vois pas trop de différence entre une ville privée et un petit pays en fait.

Link to comment
il y a 44 minutes, L'affreux a dit :

 

Et quand un enfant devient adulte ?

Je ne vois pas trop de différence entre une ville privée et un petit pays en fait.

 

+1.

 

Et il y a le problème des clauses léonines. Si la contrepartie a le droit de changer le contrat...

Link to comment
Il y a 8 heures, Extremo a dit :

Eh bien il pourrait toujours quitter la ville pour en rejoindre une autre, comme tout autre citoyen, je vois pas trop le problème.

 

… et s'éloigner de son entourage. Même chose qu'un petit pays, donc.

Link to comment
 
Eh bien il pourrait toujours quitter la ville pour en rejoindre une autre, comme tout autre citoyen, je vois pas trop le problème.

La France on l'aime ou on la quitte appliqué aux villes, la vache de révolution.
La vraie situation acceptable est de pouvoir faire sécession depuis ta propriété dans cette ville et fonder une unité plus petite. Bien entendu c'est très très peu pratique et donc illusoire, mais ce devrait être possible en théorie.
En pratique on verrait des gens s'entendre avec leurs voisins de la rue ou du quartier et fonder une unité indépendante plus petite. Bien entendu , si tu n'es que locataire dans une ville où les bâtiments appartiennent au prestataire de service de la ville, ce n'est pas possible.
  • Yea 2
Link to comment
18 hours ago, Mister_Bretzel said:

Désolé du double post mais je peux pas éditer le précédent.

 

Si on peut choisir de payer les services à l'acte au lieu d'une souscription annuelle, par exemple XX€ pour un dépôt de plainte chez les flics, ça revient finalement à l'anarcapie habituelle.

En fait, même pas sûr. Ça me fait quand même un peu trop penser à un monopole : un seul agent qui remplace une mairie et tous ses services. Bof. Des systèmes décentralisés à l'extrême pourraient être plus intéressant : Free City, OK, mais la mairie serait remplacé par X acteurs sur chaque secteur quand c'est possible (et c'est souvent le cas), et pas forcément limités à cette seule ville d'ailleurs. Je pense par exemple à la sécurité qui pourrait être exercée par plusieurs sociétés en concurrence, plutôt que la seule société de la free city.

 

10 hours ago, Extremo said:

 

Eh bien il pourrait toujours quitter la ville pour en rejoindre une autre, comme tout autre citoyen, je vois pas trop le problème.

Aujourd'hui, tu peux toujours quitter une ville qui t’assommes d’impôts locaux et/ou avec une mauvaise sécurité pour aller ailleurs. Quelle est la différence, si ce n'est dans le degré ? C'est pour moi un mauvais argument.

Link to comment
Il y a 4 heures, Tremendo a dit :

La France on l'aime ou on la quitte appliqué aux villes, la vache de révolution.

 

Il y a 4 heures, cedric.og a dit :

Aujourd'hui, tu peux toujours quitter une ville qui t’assommes d’impôts locaux et/ou avec une mauvaise sécurité pour aller ailleurs. Quelle est la différence, si ce n'est dans le degré ? C'est pour moi un mauvais argument.

 

La différence c'est qu'il y aurait infiniment plus de compétition et que, comme l'a souligné Escondido, dans une ville normale la Constitution du pays s'applique, ce qui n'est pas le cas ici.

  • Yea 1
Link to comment
 
La différence c'est qu'il y aurait infiniment plus de compétition et que, comme l'a souligné Escondido, dans une ville normale la Constitution du pays s'applique, ce qui n'est pas le cas ici.

Non mais ok ça reste infiniment mieux, mais ça ne respecte pas non plus la liberté d'association et de desassociation.
Link to comment
il y a 1 minute, Tremendo a dit :


Non mais ok ça reste infiniment mieux, mais ça ne respecte pas non plus la liberté d'association et de desassociation.

 

Après faire sécession depuis sa propriété pour former une unité plus petite dans la même ville pourquoi pas, mais à l'échelle d'une ville je pense quand même que ça reste plus pratique de tout simplement changer de ville, étant donné que quitter une ville pour une autre parmi la multitude de choix très différents juste à côté est bien plus simple que quitter un grand pays.

  • Yea 1
Link to comment
 
Après faire sécession depuis sa propriété pour former une unité plus petite dans la même ville pourquoi pas, mais à l'échelle d'une ville je pense quand même que ça reste plus pratique de tout simplement changer de ville, étant donné que quitter une ville pour une autre parmi la multitude de choix très différents juste à côté est bien plus simple que quitter un grand pays.

Oui voilà, il y a le plan théorique et le plan pratique. Faire sécession tout seul dans son coin c'est juste infernal et de l'ordre de l'irrealisable ( il faudrait négocier tout soi-même au nom de son propre pays), ce n'est pas un hasard si 99,99% de la population n'est pas rothbardienne.
Faire sécession avec son voisinage c'est déjà plus réaliste, mais à l'échelle d'une ville s'opère une division du travail et une mutualisation plus intéressantes pour chaque individu.
  • Yea 3
Link to comment
Le 3/1/2017 à 14:39, Tremendo a dit :

Faire sécession tout seul dans son coin c'est juste infernal et de l'ordre de l'irrealisable

 

Ce qui compte est la possibilité de sortir au cas par cas des engagements pris par la ville ou le pays. Par exemple la ville pourrait organiser un ramassage des ordures, payant et obligatoire, sauf pour les foyers qui souscrivent chez un autre prestataire de qualité au moins égale. Au niveau du pays, il faudrait ainsi pouvoir sortir du système de santé, des retraites, etc. Il faudrait également pouvoir sortir du cadre du droit du travail. Faire sécession pour tout d'un coup c'est de l'ordre de l'irréalisable. Si nous avions la possibilité de le faire à la carte, pour ma part ça m'irait.

 

Les villes privées, s'il s'agit d'avoir de plus petites entités mais qui refourguent toujours tout leur package de services liberticides, franchement c'est un peu mieux que les États nations actuels, juste un peu.

  • Yea 1
Link to comment
 
Ce qui compte est la possibilité de sortir au cas par cas des engagements pris par la ville ou le pays.

Ben voilà, et sur le plan théorique ca doit aller du régalien au welfare en passant par les services municipaux.
Link to comment
  • 7 months later...

http://www.discoverneom.com/

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-24/saudi-arabia-to-build-new-mega-city-on-country-s-north-coast

 

Citation

Saudi Arabia Just Announced Plans to Build a Mega City That Will Cost $500 Billion

The prince said the city project, to be called “NEOM,” will operate independently from the “existing governmental framework” with investors consulted at every step during development. The project will be backed by more than $500 billion from the Saudi government, its sovereign wealth fund and local and international investors, according to a statement released on Tuesday at an international business conference in Riyadh.

[...]

The project “seems to be broadly modeled on the ‘free zone’ concept pioneered in Dubai, where such zones are not only exempt from tariffs but also have their own regulations and laws, hence operating separately from the rest of government,” said Steffen Hertog, a professor at the London School of Economics and longtime Saudi-watcher. “In Dubai, this has worked well, but attempts to copy it have done less well in the region.”

 


-1x-1.png
 

Link to comment
  • 3 years later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 months later...
il y a 1 minute, Cthulhu a dit :

C'est moi ou il devient de plus en plus libertarien (ou a minima, il le dit plus explicitement) ?

Rappelle-toi le préambule de sa "Non-Libertarian FAQ" :

Citation

0.2: Do you hate libertarianism?

No.

To many people, libertarianism is a reaction against an over-regulated society, and an attempt to spread the word that some seemingly intractable problems can be solved by a hands-off approach. Many libertarians have made excellent arguments for why certain libertarian policies are the best options, and I agree with many of them. I think this kind of libertarianism is a valuable strain of political thought that deserves more attention, and I have no quarrel whatsoever with it and find myself leaning more and more in that direction myself.

However, there’s a certain more aggressive, very American strain of libertarianism with which I do have a quarrel. This is the strain which, rather than analyzing specific policies and often deciding a more laissez-faire approach is best, starts with the tenet that government can do no right and private industry can do no wrong and uses this faith in place of more careful analysis. This faction is not averse to discussing politics, but tends to trot out the same few arguments about why less regulation has to be better. I wish I could blame this all on Ayn Rand, but a lot of it seems to come from people who have never heard of her. I suppose I could just add it to the bottom of the list of things I blame Reagan for.

To the first type of libertarian, I apologize for writing a FAQ attacking a caricature of your philosophy, but unfortunately that caricature is alive and well and posting smug slogans on Facebook.

[...]

0.4: Why write a Non-Libertarian FAQ? Isn’t statism a bigger problem than libertarianism?

Yes. But you never run into Stalinists at parties. At least not serious Stalinists over the age of twenty-five, and not the interesting type of parties. If I did, I guess I’d try to convince them not to be so statist, but the issue’s never come up.

But the world seems positively full of libertarians nowadays. And I see very few attempts to provide a complete critique of libertarian philosophy. There are a bunch of ad hoc critiques of specific positions: people arguing for socialist health care, people in favor of gun control. But one of the things that draws people to libertarianism is that it is a unified, harmonious system. Unlike the mix-and-match philosophies of the Democratic and Republican parties, libertarianism is coherent and sometimes even derived from first principles. The only way to convincingly talk someone out of libertarianism is to launch a challenge on the entire system.

TL;DR : Je pense que si il se montre plus libertarien, c'est qu'il en croise de moins en moins dans la vraie vie.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...