Aller au contenu
Restless

Société patriarcale, justice sociale au cinéma et régime carnivore

Messages recommandés

il y a 11 minutes, Kassad a dit :

les nouveaux nés ne pouvant vivre par eux mêmes

Du coup j'ai googlé enfant sauvage, et ma foi, il y a eu des cas documentés. Mais leur rareté et le peu d'infos ont rendu les études scientifiques difficiles.

 

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enfant_sauvage

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
11 minutes ago, Bisounours said:

Du coup j'ai googlé enfant sauvage, et ma foi, il y a eu des cas documentés. Mais leur rareté et le peu d'infos ont rendu les études scientifiques difficiles.

 

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enfant_sauvage

Mais du coups s'ils sont récupérés par des animaux c'est pire : eux sont genrés pour de bon au moins :)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 4 minutes, Kassad a dit :

Mais du coups s'ils sont récupérés par des animaux c'est pire : eux sont genrés pour de bon au moins :)

En tout cas, ça remet un peu en perspective la station debout...

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie-Angélique_le_Blanc

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
4 hours ago, Philiber Té said:

On n'en avait pas déjà discuté ici de ces études ?

http://allodoxia.blog.lemonde.fr/2014/07/23/camion-poupee-jeux-singes/#part3

Non mais vu le niveau on n'y a rien perdu :online2long:

 

Allez on ajoute les chimpanzés dans la partie :

Quote

Kahlenberg, S. M., & Wrangham, R. W. (2010). Sex differences in chimpanzees' use of sticks as play objects resemble those of children. Current Biology, 20(24), R1067-R1068.

 

Sex differences in children's toy play are robust and similar across cultures 1, 2. They include girls tending to play more with dolls and boys more with wheeled toys and pretend weaponry. This pattern is explained by socialization by elders and peers, male rejection of opposite-sex behavior and innate sex differences in activity preferences that are facilitated by specific toys [1]. Evidence for biological factors is controversial but mounting. For instance, girls who have been exposed to high fetal androgen levels are known to make relatively masculine toy choices [3]. Also, when presented with sex-stereotyped human toys, captive female monkeys play more with typically feminine toys, whereas male monkeys play more with masculine toys [1]. In human and nonhuman primates, juvenile females demonstrate a greater interest in infants, and males in rough-and-tumble play. This sex difference in activity preferences parallels adult behavior and may contribute to differences in toy play [1]. Here, we present the first evidence of sex differences in use of play objects in a wild primate, in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We find that juveniles tend to carry sticks in a manner suggestive of rudimentary doll play and, as in children and captive monkeys, this behavior is more common in females than in males.

 

Quote

Lonsdorf, E. V., Anderson, K. E., Stanton, M. A., Shender, M., Heintz, M. R., Goodall, J., & Murray, C. M. (2014). Boys will be boys: sex differences in wild infant chimpanzee social interactions. Animal behaviour, 88, 79-83.

 

Sex differences in the behaviour of human children are a hotly debated and often controversial topic. However, several recent studies have documented a biological basis to key aspects of child social behaviour. To further explore the evolutionary basis of such differences, we investigated sex differences in sociability in wild chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, infants at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. We used a long-term data set on mother–infant behaviour to analyse the diversity of infant chimpanzee social partners from age 30 to 36 months. Male infants (N = 12) interacted with significantly more individuals than female infants did (N = 8), even when maternal sociability was controlled for. Furthermore, male infants interacted with significantly more adult males than female infants did. Our data indicate that the well-documented sex differences in adult chimpanzee social tendencies begin to appear quite early in development. Furthermore, these data suggest that the behavioural sex differences of human children are fundamentally rooted in our biological and evolutionary heritage.

 

Quote

Lonsdorf, E. V., Markham, A. C., Heintz, M. R., Anderson, K. E., Ciuk, D. J., Goodall, J., & Murray, C. M. (2014). Sex differences in wild chimpanzee behavior emerge during infancy. PLoS One, 9(6), e99099.

 

The role of biological and social influences on sex differences in human child development is a persistent topic of discussion and debate. Given their many similarities to humans, chimpanzees are an important study species for understanding the biological and evolutionary roots of sex differences in human development. In this study, we present the most detailed analyses of wild chimpanzee infant development to date, encompassing data from 40 infants from the long-term study of chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Our goal was to characterize age-related changes, from birth to five years of age, in the percent of observation time spent performing behaviors that represent important benchmarks in nutritional, motor, and social development, and to determine whether and in which behaviors sex differences occur. Sex differences were found for indicators of social behavior, motor development and spatial independence with males being more physically precocious and peaking in play earlier than females. These results demonstrate early sex differentiation that may reflect adult reproductive strategies. Our findings also resemble those found in humans, which suggests that biologically-based sex differences may have been present in the common ancestor and operated independently from the influences of modern sex-biased parental behavior and gender socialization.

 

(mais pas chez les bonobos ?)

Quote

Koops, K., Furuichi, T., Hashimoto, C., & Van Schaik, C. P. (2015). Sex differences in object manipulation in wild immature chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) and bonobos (Pan paniscus): Preparation for tool use?. PloS one, 10(10), e0139909.

 

Sex differences in immatures predict behavioural differences in adulthood in many mammal species. Because most studies have focused on sex differences in social interactions, little is known about possible sex differences in ‘preparation’ for adult life with regards to tool use skills. We investigated sex and age differences in object manipulation in immature apes. Chimpanzees use a variety of tools across numerous contexts, whereas bonobos use few tools and none in foraging. In both species, a female bias in adult tool use has been reported. We studied object manipulation in immature chimpanzees at Kalinzu (Uganda) and bonobos at Wamba (Democratic Republic of Congo). We tested predictions of the ‘preparation for tool use’ hypothesis. We confirmed that chimpanzees showed higher rates and more diverse types of object manipulation than bonobos. Against expectation, male chimpanzees showed higher object manipulation rates than females, whereas in bonobos no sex difference was found. However, object manipulation by male chimpanzees was play-dominated, whereas manipulation types of female chimpanzees were more diverse (e.g., bite, break, carry). Manipulation by young immatures of both species was similarly dominated by play, but only in chimpanzees did it become more diverse with age. Moreover, in chimpanzees, object types became more tool-like (i.e., sticks) with age, further suggesting preparation for tool use in adulthood. The male bias in object manipulation in immature chimpanzees, along with the late onset of tool-like object manipulation, indicates that not all (early) object manipulation (i.e., object play) in immatures prepares for subsistence tool use. Instead, given the similarity with gender differences in human children, object play may also function in motor skill practice for male-specific behaviours (e.g., dominance displays). In conclusion, even though immature behaviours almost certainly reflect preparation for adult roles, more detailed future work is needed to disentangle possible functions of object manipulation during development.

 

Un autre avantage de travailler avec des primates non humains est qu'on peut étudier le lien entre ces comportements différenciés et les hormones pré-natales, un "niveau intermédiaire" entre génétique et influence sociale :

Quote

Thornton, J., Zehr, J. L., & Loose, M. D. (2009). Effects of prenatal androgens on rhesus monkeys: a model system to explore the organizational hypothesis in primates. Hormones and Behavior, 55(5), 633-644.

 

After proposing the organizational hypothesis from research in prenatally androgenized guinea pigs (Phoenix, C.H., Goy, R.W., Gerall, A.A., Young, W.C., 1959. Organizational action of prenatally administered testosterone propionate on the tissues mediating mating behavior in the female guinea pig. Endocrinology 65, 369-382.), the same authors almost immediately extended the hypothesis to a nonhuman primate model, the rhesus monkey. Studies over the last 50 years have verified that prenatal androgens have permanent effects in rhesus monkeys on the neural circuits that underlie sexually dimorphic behaviors. These behaviors include both sexual and social behaviors, all of which are also influenced by social experience. Many juvenile behaviors such as play, mounting, and vocal behaviors are masculinized and/or defeminized, and aspects of adult sexual behavior are both masculinized (e.g. approaches, sex contacts, and mounts) and defeminized (e.g. sexual solicits). Different behavioral endpoints have different periods of maximal susceptibility to the organizing actions of prenatal androgens. Aromatization is not important, as both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are equally effective in rhesus monkeys. Although the full story of the effects of prenatal androgens on sexual and social behaviors in the rhesus monkey has not yet completely unfolded, much progress has been made. Amazingly, a large number of the inferences drawn from the original 1959 study have proved applicable to this nonhuman primate model.

 

Quote
Wallen, K., & Hassett, J. M. (2009). Sexual differentiation of behaviour in monkeys: role of prenatal hormones. Journal of neuroendocrinology, 21(4), 421-426.

 

The theoretical debate over the relative contributions of nature and nurture to sexual differentiation of behavior has increasingly moved towards an interactionist explanation requiring both influences. In practice, however, nature and nurture have often been seen as separable, influencing human clinical sex assignment decisions, sometimes with disastrous consequences. Decisions about sex assignment of children born with intersex conditions have been based almost exclusively on the appearance of the genitals and how other’s reactions to the gender role of the assigned sex affects individual gender socialization. Effects of the social environment and gender expectations in human cultures are ubiquitous, overshadowing potential underlying biological contributions in favor of the more observable social influences. Recent work in nonhuman primates showing behavioral sex differences paralleling human sex differences, including toy preferences, suggests that less easily observed biological factors also influence behavioral sexual differentiation in both monkeys and humans. We review research, including Robert W. Goy’s pioneering work with rhesus monkeys which manipulated prenatal hormones at different gestation times and demonstrated that genital anatomy and specific behaviors are independently sexually differentiated. Such studies demonstrate that for a variety of behaviors, including juvenile mounting and rough play, individuals can have the genitals of one sex but show the behavior more typical of the other sex. We describe another case, infant distress vocalizations, where maternal responsiveness is best accounted for by the mother’s response to the genital appearance of her offspring. Together these studies demonstrate that sexual differentiation arises from complex interactions where anatomical and behavioral biases, produced by hormonal and other biological processes, are shaped by social experience into the behavioral sex differences that distinguish males from females.

 

Et puis ne laissons pas tomber les humains aussi facilement :

Quote
Todd, B. K., Fischer, R. A., Di Costa, S., Roestorf, A., Harbour, K., Hardiman, P., & Barry, J. A. (2018). Sex differences in children's toy preferences: A systematic review, meta‐regression, and meta‐analysis. Infant and Child Development, 27(2), e2064.

 
From an early age, most children choose to play with toys typed to their own gender. In order to identify variables that predict toy preference, we conducted a meta‐analysis of observational studies of the free selection of toys by boys and girls aged between 1 and 8 years. From an initial pool of 1788 papers, 16 studies (787 boys and 813 girls) met our inclusion criteria. We found that boys played with male‐typed toys more than girls did (Cohen's d = 1.03, p < .0001) and girls played with female‐typed toys more than boys did (Cohen's d = −0.91, p < .0001). Meta‐regression showed no significant effect of presence of an adult, study context, geographical location of the study, publication date, child's age, or the inclusion of gender‐neutral toys. However, further analysis of data for boys and girls separately revealed that older boys played more with male‐typed toys relative to female‐typed toys than did younger boys (β = .68, p < .0001). Additionally, an effect of the length of time since study publication was found: girls played more with female‐typed toys in earlier studies than in later studies (β = .70, p < .0001), whereas boys played more with male‐typed toys (β = .46, p < .05) in earlier studies than in more recent studies. Boys also played with male‐typed toys less when observed in the home than in a laboratory (β = −.46, p < .05). Findings are discussed in terms of possible contributions of environmental influences and age‐related changes in boys' and girls' toy preferences.

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 5 heures, Rincevent a dit :

Tu oublies les nourrissons quand tu parles d'enfants de 2 ans. Merci de montrer aussi explicitement la distance entre toi et la plaque (j'aurais peut-être pu mieux flécher la plaque, mettre des néons autour en parlant de "nouveaux-nés", mais tu aurais sans doute tout autant périplaqué en ergotant que les expériences portaient sur des bébés de quelques semaines voire quelques jours, et non pas sur des bébés sortis à l'instant du ventre maternel).

 

Décidément, je dois très mal m'exprimer ! Quand je parle de la situation plus tôt qu'à l'âge de 2 ans, je parle bien des nourrissons. D'où le "très tôt" et la crèche qui arrive "tardivement" dans mon premier message.

Si ce n'est toujours pas clair dit comme ça, la prochaine fois je dessine une frise chronologique, promis.

 

Il y a 4 heures, cedric.org a dit :

Pour aller dans ce sens, certains ont voulu tenter d'observer des nourissons en y excluant tout impact de la société (i.e aucun lien avec quiconque). Ca s'est plutôt mal terminé.

Vouloir faire, pour une espèce fondamentalement sociale, une distinction claire entre inné et acquis, c'est se tromper de débat, d'un côté comme de l'autre.

 

Les féministes disent que les différences sociales entres les hommes et les femmes sont le fait du patriarcat, et qu'il faut changer la manière dont on éduque les garçons et les filles, si on souhaite changer ça.

On leur répond qu'il existe des différences sexuelles entre les hommes et les femmes, que ce n'est pas qu'une histoire de définition des genres, mais qu'il y a dès le départ des comportements / affinités différentes.

A partir de là, on tombe rapidement dans la dichotomie inné vs acquis : est-ce qu'il y a des différences insurmontables (chez les enfants puis chez les adultes) qui rendent les critiques et les objectifs des féministes ineptes ? Sous-entendu, si c'est inné, c'est comme ça et c'est tout.

 

Un exemple : s'il y a peu de femmes dans les domaines mécaniques, est-ce parce qu'on les détourne de ce domaine ou bien est-ce l'expression d'une affinité sexuelle (ou plutôt d'un aversion) ? Si les petits garçons vont "naturellement" jouer avec des petites voitures, c'est à dire sans qu'on leur ai dit ou qu'on les ai influencé, c'est une affinité "innée". L'éducation des petites filles (et le traitement des jeunes femmes) n'a donc rien à voir avec la distribution des genres dans les domaines mécaniques.

 

il y a une heure, Kassad a dit :

En l'occurrence tu tombes sur un équivalent du principe d'incertitude d'Heisenberg pour les sciences sociales. Tu veux mesurer l'impact de l'influence sociétale mais cela se fait précisément par des interactions sociales : les nouveaux nés ne pouvant vivre par eux mêmes. 

 

C'est pas que c'est difficile sinon que c'est impossible.

 

D'où ma réflexion sur les interactions parents/enfants dès la naissance.

Et ma blague sur les enfants piégés dans une bulle...

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Le 14/01/2019 à 18:48, Lancelot a dit :

Et puis ne laissons pas tomber les humains aussi facilement

J'en pose une autre comme je viens de tomber dessus.

 

Sex differences in human neonatal social perception

 

Citation

102 human neonates, who by definition have not yet been influenced by social and cultural factors, were tested to see if there was a difference in looking time at a face (social object) and a mobile (physical-mechanical object). Results showed that the male infants showed a stronger interest in the physical-mechanical mobile while the female infants showed a stronger interest in the face. The results of this research clearly demonstrate that sex differences are in part biological in origin.

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Le 14/01/2019 à 19:51, Philiber Té a dit :

Si les petits garçons vont "naturellement" jouer avec des petites voitures, c'est à dire sans qu'on leur ai dit ou qu'on les ai influencé, c'est une affinité "innée".

Il n'y avait pas une expérience il y a des années avec des jouets et des bébés singes qui avaient vu une tendance des petits singes mâles attirés par les jouets pour garçons et les femelles attirées par les jouets pour filles?

Pas parce que le petit singe mâle voulait sa testarossa bien sûr mais "probablement" pour des histoires de couleurs et de formes (coulerus saturées/non saturées; douces/dures, etc)

 

edit: tiens en une recherche google j'ai ça qui ressort: https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn13596-male-monkeys-prefer-boys-toys/

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 25 minutes, Alchimi a dit :

Pas parce que le petit singe mâle voulait sa testarossa bien sûr mais "probablement" pour des histoires de couleurs et de formes (coulerus saturées/non saturées; douces/dures, etc)

Je dirais plutôt forme humanoïde primatoïde ou non.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 1 minute, Rincevent a dit :

Je dirais plutôt forme humanoïde primatoïde ou non.

Ouais enfin si je lis l'article c'était jouet à roulettes versus peluches genre winnie l'ourson.

Donc t'as les autres variables de formes dures/douces, éléments mobiles (roues), douceur de la matière, etc. Il ne faut pas aller trop vite avec la forme primatoïde, même si c'est un paramètre aussi of course!

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 49 minutes, Alchimi a dit :

peluches genre winnie l'ourson

Qui est nettement plus primatoïde qu'un vrai ours, tu remarqueras. ;)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
2 hours ago, Alchimi said:

Il n'y avait pas une expérience il y a des années avec des jouets et des bébés singes qui avaient vu une tendance des petits singes mâles attirés par les jouets pour garçons et les femelles attirées par les jouets pour filles?

L'expé dont on parle 4 messages au dessus ? :lol:

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 1 heure, Lancelot a dit :

L'expé dont on parle 4 messages au dessus ? :lol:

Ah oui tiens j'avais juste répondu au post de Philiber Té et je n'avais pas parcouru ton pavé de citation.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant

  • En ligne récemment   0 membre est en ligne

    Aucun utilisateur enregistré regarde cette page.

×