Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

La Fougère

Actualité des marchés 2008

Recommended Posts

Je pige pas comment tu fais, tu shortes les fonds que tu as cités ? Si t'es résident français, tu n'es pas emmerdé au niveau administratif ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Je pige pas comment tu fais, tu shortes les fonds que tu as cités ? Si t'es résident français, tu n'es pas emmerdé au niveau administratif ?

ce ne sont pas des fonds, ce sont des ETF, càd c'est une action d'un fond. ça se trade comme une action.

je prends des options

j'ai un compte chez un broker qui est connecté à la plupart des places du monde.

http://www.interactivebrokers.com/ibg/main.php

Pour l'administration, tu signes électroniquement des trucs pour les impôts us, donc je suppose qu'avec les accords qu'ils ont avec la france, ça doit être transmis.

logiquement, je ne déclarerais que les plus-values le jour où je sors le fric du compte du broker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/e3f7990e-d555-11…?nclick_check=1

D Bank chief warns of monoline ‘tsunami’

By Chris Hughes in Frankfurt

Published: February 7 2008 08:40 | Last updated: February 7 2008 20:49

Credit rating downgrades of troubled bond insurers could trigger a potential financial “tsunami” that could be as far-reaching as the subprime mortgage crisis, the chief executive of Deutsche Bank warned on Thursday.

The alert by Josef Ackermann came as the banking sector continued to suffer from fears that rating downgrades to bond insurers, or monolines could lead to another round of writedowns of investments and renewed capital constraints. If the monolines are downgraded, the bonds they insure fall in value.

Mr Ackermann forecast that the US would see a sharp economic slowdown but would avoid a recession “assuming no monoline tsunami hitting us”. But he added in an interview with Bloomberg that the downgrades among the bond insurers could trigger a “tsunami-like event comparable to subprime’’. Mr Ackermann said the German bank was well placed to cope with the challenges ahead. Even a “meltdown” in the monoline sector would be “manageable” due to hedges on its exposure.

Deutsche earlier bucked the gloom among investment banks by saying it was sticking to its pre-tax profit target for this year after posting better-than-expected fourth-quarter results.

Pre-tax profits at Germany’s largest bank fell 25 per cent to €1.4bn ($2.04bn) in the last three months of 2007. The figures benefited from the absence of fresh writedowns on mortgage-related and structured credit securities, which in the third quarter had totalled €1.56bn. Writedowns on its leveraged finance portfolio were €44m, against €603m in the preceding quarter.

Mr Ackermann said the bank was placed to take market share in its businesses this year, reaffirming the bank’s goal to make €8.4bn pre-tax profits this year.

Mr Ackermann, who turned 60 on Thursday, said that he did not believe a large merger with another wholesale bank would make sense for Deutsche.

However, he said Deutsche would be interested in buying a German retail bank such as Postbank if it were approached.

Anshu Jain, global head of markets, said he did not expect the London-based investment banking operations to see drastic cuts.

Mr Ackermann also warned that investment bank compensation would become “a political issue” after several banks upped their bonus pools in spite of poor performance. Shares in Deutsche rose 0.4 per cent to €75.27.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oui, je connais les ETF, ce que je ne connais pas, ce sont les puts sur ETF, j'ai pas trouvé ça sur les sites que tu présentais.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oui, je connais les ETF, ce que je ne connais pas, ce sont les puts sur ETF, j'ai pas trouvé ça sur les sites que tu présentais.

Tu vas sur ton compte de broker, tu mets le ticker de l'etf et tu cliques 'options'.

ya même des futurs sur un certain nombre d'entre eux.

Les gros ETFs sectoriels ont des options et des futurs.

sinon dans la brochure, ya écrit "short selling yes, options : yes"

http://www.sectorspdr.com/shared/pdf/facts…ctSheet_XLF.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Le balancier de l’Histoire

Ecrit par Henri Lepage

Institut Hayek - 14-02-2008

http://www.fahayek.org/index.php?option=co…8&Itemid=45

Je n'ai pas reproduit le texte ici en raison des liens internes qu'il contient.

Le coup des cycles longs qui tombent du ciel, ça fait déterministe. C'est étonnant de marier cela avec de l'autrichianisme.

Que nous ne soyons pas à la crise finale du capitalisme, soit, mais il va tout de même y avoir de grosses corrections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[…] C'est étonnant de marier cela avec de l'autrichianisme. […]

On dit austrianisme, me semble-t-il. :icon_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austrian, c'est en anglais.

Austria, c'est en Latin (cf. la devise des Habsbourg : A.E.I.O.U.). :icon_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Le coup des cycles longs qui tombent du ciel, ça fait déterministe. C'est étonnant de marier cela avec de l'autrichianisme.

Que nous ne soyons pas à la crise finale du capitalisme, soit, mais il va tout de même y avoir de grosses corrections.

Entièrement d'accord pour ce qui est des cycles longs mais l'intérêt du texte dépasse largement cet aspect. :icon_up:

Sans transition…

Jim Rogers Interview: Where to Put Your Money

Jim Rogers ne mâche pas ses mots.

(Je me suis permis de mettre en gras quelques passages.)

Une version sonore de l’entretien est disponible à cette adresse :

http://www.resourceinvestor.com/pebble.asp?relid=39907

JOHANNESBURG (ResourceInvestor.com) -- Lindsay Williams for Resource Investor speaks with Jim Rogers, co-founder of the Quantum Fund, about the financial woes hitting the U.S. markets - and where to put your money.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Jim Rogers started the Quantum Fund with George Soros a couple of decades ago, probably three decades ago actually. He’s a legendary investor. He’s a bestselling author and he’s a prolific commentator and never a day goes by when you don’t see him on Financial Times Television or Bloomberg or listen to him on the wireless and he’s on the wireless now.

Jim, before we get into what’s happening with commodities, which is one of your favourite subjects, what do you think about the recent market action?

JIM ROGERS: Not very surprised. I’m just – the only surprise to me is why didn’t it start sooner. I’m afraid we’re going to see much worse before the year’s over. America’s going to be in its worst recession for some time. We’ve had the worst housing bubble we’ve had in American history, maybe even world history. So, unfortunately, it’s not good news. There’s still many problems to be revealed and more losses to be taken.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Yeah, it really does appear to be so. I wonder what Mr. Bernanke’s going to be doing. But what it amounts to is the same policy that they’ve always employed when they get a small so-called crisis; instead of letting the cycle run its natural course, they chuck money at the problem. Do you think he’s going to do it again?

JIM ROGERS: Of course he is and it’s just going to make it worse, you very astutely pointed out instead of just letting the cycle run its course – the Japanese tried for 15 years to keep propping up, you know, zombie companies, etcetera, etcetera, and it took them 15 years and they’re still aren’t out of the woods. They should just go ahead – recessions are common. We’ve been having them every five or six years since the beginning of time. They’re good. They clean out the previous excesses. They let the system start over with a sound basis.

I mean, obviously, some people get hurt, but we have a lot of safety nets in place now throughout most of the world so that it’s not the end of the world and the amount of money spent trying to prevent a recession in the end costs a whole lot more than just letting the world have its recession then get on with it.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Yeah, I’ve been writing an article on Allan Greenspan and his tenure for a local magazine, Jim, and I’ve been surprised at looking at some of the quotes that have been attributed to Greenspan ever since he took over as Fed Chairman in 1987. I’ll just read one to you if I may briefly. It says – he said the following back in 2003, 2004, “Innovation has brought about a multitude of new products such as sub-prime loans and also niche credit programs for immigrants. Such developments are representative of the market responses that have driven the financial services industry throughout the history of our country. With these advances in technology, lenders have taken advantage of credit scoring models and other techniques of efficiently extending credit to a broader spectrum of consumers.” I mean the more I read about Greenspan, the more I realize he’s at the root of our current problems.

JIM ROGERS: Oh no, of course he is. I mean he’s laid the foundation for the demise of the Federal Reserve. Between Greenspan and Bernanke, we may see the Federal Reserve fail. We’ve had three central banks in America. The first two failed. This one’s going to fail too. I mean if you really – we could spend a whole program, a whole year of programs, reading quotes from Greenspan and you would realize what a fool he’s been.

In my book, “Investment Biker,” I wrote that the man was a fool. I’ve been on TV many times talking about, oh, he just sat and watched CNBC and repeated it and said, “This is the way the world is.” He never got it right, Lindsay. What was so astonishing to me was that his PR machine made some people think he was a smart guy. He never got it right in his entire investing career. I could go back over many of his failures too, but let’s go on with the program.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Yeah, let’s do. But briefly, before we leave the subject, do you think that Bernanke is just going to become another Greenspan?

JIM ROGERS: He’s worse. All he knows is to print money. His whole intellectual career has been spent studying the printing of money. America’s now given him the printing presses and all he knows to do it to run them. He doesn’t know about markets. He doesn’t know about foreign currencies. We know now he doesn’t even know about economics. I mean, he’s got a PhD in economics and he was a professor of economics, but he doesn’t have a clue about economics.

I will quote you – I hate to quote you, but one more time - I was watching him testify before congress and I almost fell out of my chair. He said under oath, so we presume he wasn’t lying, that he was just a fool, he said if an American only buys American products, it does not matter to him if the value of the U.S. dollar goes down. He will not be affected. I was looking at the man to see if he was lying, giving government propaganda, but then I could see he didn’t even really understand.

He didn’t understand if, you know, even if say I’m an American, Lindsay, and I only buy American tires. Well if the price of foreign tires goes up, obviously the price of American tires are going to go up too. Plus, if the dollar goes down, the price of rubber’s going to go higher, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.

So the man doesn’t even understand economics. He’s going to print money. He’s going to throw money out the window. The dollar’s going to go down further and further and further. Inflation’s going to get worse and worse and worse throughout the world – the world, not just America - and we’re going to have a worse recession in the end.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: He says that the inflation problem is a lesser problem than a slow-growth cycle. What would be your comment on that analysis?

JIM ROGERS: Well, no. You know better than that. Inflation damages everything. It distorts all economic planning, all economic decision making. A slow economic profile or whatever he called it – we get over recessions. They end. But once you start embedding inflation into the entire nation’s economy, that’s one thing. Then it changes everything. It changes currencies. It changes foreigners’ perceptions of their own economy, their own currency, their own cost of doing business.

You know, what he’s doing is going to – he’s trying to save a few guys on Wall Street, a few friends on Wall Street, but what he’s really going to do is damage 300 million – well not just 300 million Americans - he’s going to damage the whole world. But he doesn’t care. He’s just looking to save his friends on Wall Street, and he thinks he’ll go down in history as a smart guy. Going to go down in history as one of the two gigantic failures of central banking.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Right. Let’s say that there is a recession as you seem to believe the U.S. already in recession and that recession will come deeper. Does that change your view on commodities, because if there’s a recession in the states then it could affect, obviously, world growth and therefore the growth of commodity demand? Does that worry you?

JIM ROGERS: Maybe temporarily it’ll cause a slowdown in commodity demand, but that makes the long term bull case even greater because if all of a sudden the commodity producers think, “Well, this is not real,” then they’re not going to go out and open that new zinc mine and they’re not going to go out and look for that expensive oil. They’re not going to spend a lot of the money they might have spent otherwise.

So it just prolongs the whole secular bull market. No, absolutely. You have corrections and consolidations in every bull market no matter what the asset. You always have. That’s the way markets work. Nothing goes straight up, Lindsay. You know that. So if commodities go down for a quarter or a year or two, it’s not the end of the bull market. As I said earlier, it’s probably going to make it even last longer.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: The bull market in commodities is – has been – has had various cycles, various components to it. The agricultural one is the one that you picked quite a while ago. And more and more commentary that I read says it could last for decades. So I mean it’s a very simple equation. There’s more demand and there’s less supply. Are you becoming more confident of agriculturals?

JIM ROGERS: Well, I’ve been buying them in the recent past, a few weeks ago. I bought more ags, yes. Agriculture is the best place – one of the few places - where I would put money in the investment markets right now. I’d buy agriculture. I’d buy the renminbi, the Swiss frank, the Japanese yen, but beyond that, there’s not much I see that I would be buying. Agriculture’s still extremely depressed on a historic basis. There are very sound and strong fundamental changes taking place for the better.

People who say it’s going to go on for decades, I’m dubious, if you don’t mind my saying so because I mean, I’ve seen this before in bull markets and read about many of the bull markets. None of them have lasted forever. This one probably won’t either, but if it lasts another 10 or 15 years I’ll be quite happy.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Looking back at Wall Street now, I just noticed this afternoon, Bank of America came out with its earnings. Its earnings have dropped, it says here, 95% after $5.28 billion of mortgage related write-downs. The American investments banks was one place you said you didn’t want to be about a year ago. Do you think they’re staring to show some value now that they’ve been so badly whacked?

JIM ROGERS: Well, what I actually said a year ago was that I’d sell them short and I’m still short. No. They don’t show value at all. If they rally, I’m going to short more. I mean Bear Sterns still sells at $77.00. Merrill Lynch still sells at $53.00. You know, in real bear markets, Lindsay, these stocks are going to sell at $10, not specifically those two, but all the – go back and look at previous bear markets. Investment banks get killed for many, many, many reasons. Their inventories go down, their customers dry up, everything goes bad and the stocks sell at, you know, very, very, very low prices. Let them rally. I’m going to sell more.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Yeah, the argument that I get from a lot of fund managers in South Africa when it comes to the argument over banks is that they’re historically on very low price earnings ratios and their multiples are low and they come up with every single excuse in the book as why we should be buying them and every day I see them going down further. So what you say you can throw that sort of historical analysis out the window? In a bear market, they’re the ones that are going to suffer?

JIM ROGERS: Of course they are. I mean first of all, the earnings are phoney earnings. I mean the balance sheets are phoney balance sheets. They quite openly acknowledge these days that they have something they call tier three assets. Well, tier three assets are assets that they don’t price because they can’t price them and so far, the accountants have let them get away with that. Well, soon, the accountants are going to make them admit that those tier three assets don’t have much value and you’re going to see huge write-downs.

And remember, the stocks are down now, Lindsay, because of what’s been going on in sub-prime, etcetera. Wait until they start getting affected by the bear market. They haven’t even been affected by the bear market yet. But when customers dry up, trading volumes dry up and mergers and acquisitions dry up and the earnings will really dry up.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: You paint a very gloomy picture for the future, Jim. I noticed in one of the….

JIM ROGERS: Oh, no, no, wait. What’s gloomy? Hold on. What’s gloomy? That was gloomy for Wall Street. I told you if you’re a farmer, you’re about to get rich. What are you talking about gloomy?

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Gloomy for those poor Wall Street people.

JIM ROGERS: A lot more farmers in the world than there are Wall Street bankers.

:doigt:

Ce qui s'appelle ramener les choses à leurs justes proportions… ou mettre en perspective…

Une des raisons pour lesquelles j'apprecie tant ce gars là .

La suite:

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Yeah, well said. I noticed you, in an article in one of the news wires that you’d sold your townhouse in New York. Is there – are you clearing out?

JIM ROGERS: Well, I’ve moved to Singapore. We’ve moved to Asia. So, clearing out? Yes. I’ve moved to Asia. I don’t have any – I don’t have a home anywhere in America anymore. I’m still an American citizen, but no. We’ve left.

RESOURCE INVESTOR: Jim, if you want to get into the agricultural market, what is the most efficient way to do it if you don't have the wherewithal to be able to utilize, you know, the Chicago Board of Trade and things like that. Are there indices that one should look at without having to monitor them every day, a simple way of getting in, in other words?

JIM ROGERS: Well, Lindsay, I mean many academics and many consultants have demonstrated over and over again the best way for most people to invest in anything, stocks, currencies, whatever, is through an index. I’m not the first to come up with that and you either. That’s been demonstrated too many times. People who invest in indexes outperform 80% of active fund managers year after year after year.

So the best thing for most people to do is buy an index. I mean first do your homework and decide, “Yes, I want to buy stocks. Yes, I want to buy American stocks. Yes, I want to buy commodities,” whatever it is. And then if you decide you want to buy that asset class, the best way to invest, no matter what the asset class, is to buy an index.

(Resource Investor Podcasts are now available on iTunes! Simply download iTunes, go to the iTunes Store, and click on “Power Search” in the Quick Links box on the right-hand side. Search for “Resource Investor” in the title box, and subscribe. The iTunes Store will automatically update your iTunes when a new podcast becomes available.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Entièrement d'accord pour ce qui est des cycles longs mais l'intérêt du texte dépasse largement cet aspect. :doigt:

Sans transition…

Jim Rogers Interview: Where to Put Your Money

Jim Rogers ne mâche pas ses mots.

(Je me suis permis de mettre en gras quelques passages.)

Une version sonore de l’entretien est disponible à cette adresse :

http://www.resourceinvestor.com/pebble.asp?relid=39907

:mrgreen:

Ce qui s'appelle ramener les choses à leurs justes proportions… ou mettre en perspective…

Une des raisons pour lesquelles j'apprecie tant ce gars là .

+ :icon_up:

Ce type à le pouvoir de dire tout haut ce que le quidam libéral pense tout bas. Chapeau.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+ :icon_up:

Ce type à le pouvoir de dire tout haut ce que le quidam libéral pense tout bas. Chapeau.

:doigt: Oui, c'est particulièrement savoureux.

Sans transition

Le pétrole à 100 $ -- et l'or ?

par Bill Bonner - Jeudi 21 Février 2008

http://www.la-chronique-agora.com/articles/20080221-664.html

** Grande nouvelle : le baril de pétrole a dépassé les 100 $ pour la première fois cette semaine.

* Les actions, pendant ce temps, ne vont nulle part.

* Que se passe-t-il ?

* Commençons par la fin. "Achetez de l'or durant les creux… vendez les actions pendant les rebonds". Telle est notre Transaction de la Décennie.

* Hier, nous proposions une modeste hypothèse. Prises entre les feux croisés de l'inflation et de la déflation, les actions ont été immobilisées. Elles "devraient" baisser, mais elles reçoivent des signaux contradictoires. La déflation les force à baisser la tête -- mais l'inflation les empêche de battre en retraite. Elles sont coincées.

* De nombreux analystes observent l'inaction des marchés et pensent discerner croissance et prospérité à l'horizon. "Si une récession était vraiment en chemin, les marchés la verraient certainement", disent-ils. Mais les marchés la voient bien ! Simplement, ils voient aussi autre chose arriver d'une autre direction -- l'inflation. Ils sont pris entre les deux, sans nulle part où aller.

* L'or et le pétrole voient la même chose. D'un côté, la déflation "devrait" les faire baisser eux aussi. De l'autre, l'inflation les fera sûrement grimper. Mais ils ont une réaction différente de celle des actions. Pour commencer, ils sont plus mondialisés que les marchés actions. Alors que l'économie américaine ralentit, la Chine, l'Inde et l'Amérique Latine enregistrent encore une croissance rapide. Certes, ces pays vont devoir lever un peu le pied quand les consommateurs américains cesseront de tant acheter, mais ils ont leurs propres consommateurs pour prendre… peu à peu… le relais.

* Ensuite, alors que les Etats-Unis sont au centre du ralentissement économique déflationniste, l'inflation est un phénomène plus planétaire. Le taux d'inflation en Chine, par exemple, est plus élevé qu'aux Etats-Unis. Les prix des appartements à Buenos Aires… les tickets de métro à Paris… les hamburgers à Singapour -- tout grimpe.

* Par le passé, l'inflation a toujours eu une carte nationale d'identité. L'inflation des années 20 se concentrait en Allemagne, où l'hyperinflation a fauché la classe moyenne et mis le pays en route pour la ruine. Les investisseurs ont dû déménager leur épargne en France ou en Angleterre pour y échapper. De même, en Argentine, l'inflation des années 80 était facilement évitable -- il suffisait de mettre son argent dans une banque de Miami. Traditionnellement, le dollar était un refuge pour les gens souhaitant se protéger contre l'inflation -- même si le billet vert lui-même perdait rapidement de sa valeur. En 1935, un dollar US avait à peu près le même pouvoir d'achat qu'un dollar US de 1800. Mais à partir de là, il a entamé un déclin rapide… effaçant 95% de sa valeur au cours des 70 ans qui suivirent. Tout de même, les gens qui avaient de l'argent préféraient généralement le conserver en dollars plutôt qu'en zlotys, par exemple. Le dollar perdait peut-être de la valeur, mais il le faisait de manière douce, apparemment contrôlée.

* Les temps ont changé, désormais. Un nouveau genre d'inflation est apparu -- il est pratiquement partout… dans tous les pays… et risque d'échapper à tout contrôle. Voilà pourquoi l'or atteint de nouveaux sommets -- par rapport à toutes les devises … et tous les marchés… ou presque… dans le monde.

** On appris hier que la Fed avait discrètement prêté environ 50 milliards de dollars à ses membres en utilisant une nouvelle méthode -- des "enchères" permettant aux banques de présenter des nantissements non-conventionnels. Le gouvernement américain ne publie plus les chiffres du M3, la mesure la plus large de la masse monétaire, mais selon certains analystes, elle grimpe de 15% par an -- soit environ six fois plus rapidement que le PIB US.

* La majeure partie de cet argent termine en dehors des Etats-Unis. C'est également là que finit la majorité de la dette du Trésor US. Le dollar est la principale exportation des Etats-Unis -- et celle qui a la marge la plus élevée. Cela a forcé les banques centrales étrangères à créer plus de leurs propres devises pour acheter ces dollars, sans quoi elles se seraient trouvées confrontées à un désavantage concurrentiel : le dollar aurait chuté par rapport à leurs devises locales, rendant leurs exportations plus chères sur les marchés mondiaux.

* Le monde entier est donc noyé sous le papier. Des dollars papier… des euros papier… des rands papier… des cordobas papier… du papier monnaie de toutes sortes. Où l'investisseur peut-il aller pour échapper à ces flots de papier ? Que peut-il acheter pour se protéger de l'inflation ? Comment peut-il respirer ?

* Eh oui : l'or. Voilà pourquoi le marché haussier actuel de l'or pourrait être encore plus impressionnant que le précédent. A l'époque, à la fin des années 70, c'était principalement le dollar US qui souffrait de l'inflation… et principalement les Américains, voire les exportateurs de pétrole arabes, qui achetaient de l'or. Les Russes en étaient encore à construire des voitures qui ne roulaient pas. Les Chinois se remettaient de leur Grand Bond en Avant des années 60, et démontaient leurs aciéries de jardin. Quant aux Indiens, ils n'étaient pas encore réveillés.

* A présent, le monde est différent. Le papier monnaie y est plus abondant que jamais… et des milliards de gens alertes voudront s'en protéger. Ils essaieront peut-être les actions… ou l'immobilier… ou les Rembrandt… mais traditionnellement, la solution la plus sûre et la plus simple, c'est l'or.

Note : Cet article vous a plu ? Pour recevoir tous les jours l'édition complète de La Chronique Agora par e-mail, il suffit de vous inscrire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La Vision de l'Economiste - Numéro 66 - Février 2008

Laisser passer l’orage

http://www.hdf-finance.org/pdf/VisionEconomiste_0208.pdf

par Christian de Boissieu

Professeur à Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) - Rédaction achevée le 12 février 2008

Un extrait (la fin):

2) Les perspectives des marchés financiers

Politique monétaire et taux courts

La Fed n’a pas fini d’abaisser son taux directeur. La BCE quant à elle va probablement jouer le statu quo (taux directeur à 4 %) pendant la première moitié de 2008. Si décrue de ce taux il y a, elle interviendra plutôt au cours du second semestre, lorsque le taux d’inflation dans la zone euro sera revenu vers le seuil de tolérance de 2 %.

Par delà la politique de taux, il faut reconnaître que la BCE a, globale-ment parlant, bien géré les conséquences de la crise des « subprimes » en fournissant aux banques en difficulté les liquidités requises.

Le dollar : toujours fragile

La dynamique des taux courts des deux côtés de l’Atlantique est susceptible d’alimenter un nouveau recul du dollar, sur fond de déficit extérieur américain certes en recul en 2007 (par rapport à 2006) mais toujours conséquent.

L’euro risque, dans les mois qui viennent, d’atteindre et de dépasser le seuil de 1,50 dollar. La question pendante pour les Européens en 2008 comme en 2007 n’est pas seulement la montée de l’euro vis-à-vis du dollar, dont les inconvénients l’emportent aujourd’hui sur les avantages (dont la réduction de la facture pétrolière). Elle est aussi celle du partage du fardeau : nous sommes en fait dans le contexte d’une guerre monétaire qui ne dit pas son nom, où beaucoup de pays veulent suivre le dollar à la baisse (la Chine, le Japon…) et dans laquelle l’euro est pratiquement la seule devise à monter.

L’allocation d’actifs en 2008

La crise des « subprimes » est aujourd’hui, comme depuis août dernier, une crise de la liquidité bancaire dans un monde qui regorge de liquidités.

Ces liquidités, un peu moins attirées par l’immobilier (logement) qui corrige sévèrement (cas des Etats-Unis) ou atterrit plus en douceur (exemple de la France), vont continuer de s’investir dans les fonds de matières premières, sur les marchés financiers émergents… Les marchés d’actions devraient terminer l’année 2008 mieux qu’ils ne l’ont commencée, pour plusieurs raisons : valeurs modérées des « price-earnings » (PER), maintien des profits des grandes entreprises et de la plupart des banques à des niveaux élevés, rythme toujours soutenu des fusions-acquisitions dans la plupart des secteurs…

La méthodologie de gestion va demeurer décisive. Dans des marchés financiers qui souffrent en ce moment mais qui devraient se redresser en cours d’année, les stratégies de la gestion alternative devraient, globalement, se révéler attractives et efficaces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
La Vision de l'Economiste - Numéro 66 - Février 2008

Laisser passer l’orage

http://www.hdf-finance.org/pdf/VisionEconomiste_0208.pdf

par Christian de Boissieu

Professeur à Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) - Rédaction achevée le 12 février 2008

Un extrait (la fin):

Donc faut prendre du DBA (ETF sur des futures de blé, mais, sucre et soja) : http://www.powershares.com/products/overview.aspx?ticker=DBA et du futur d'or

sinon, il vient de sortir le GCC (etf sur corn, wheat, soybeans, live cattle, lean hogs, gold, platinum, silver, copper, coffee, sugar, cotton, orange juice, crude oil, heating oil and natural gas) http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=gcc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Donc faut prendre du DBA (ETF sur des futures de blé, mais, sucre et soja) : http://www.powershares.com/products/overview.aspx?ticker=DBA et du futur d'or

sinon, il vient de sortir le GCC (etf sur corn, wheat, soybeans, live cattle, lean hogs, gold, platinum, silver, copper, coffee, sugar, cotton, orange juice, crude oil, heating oil and natural gas) http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=gcc

Euh comment je dois prendre le "donc faut prendre" ? …

Même si (nous sommes nombreux à penser que) la tendance long terme reste haussière sur les matières premières en général, elle peuvent corriger à court terme (et ce serait peut-être assez sain).

C’est l’occasion pour moi de clarifier 2 ou 3 trucs… :icon_up:

Même pour les béliers ascendant taureau ?

Non, non, c’est surtout parce que nous sommes dans l’année du Rat ! :

:mrgreen:

Bienvenue dans l’année du Rat.

L’année Chinoise du Rat démarre cette semaine et succède à l’année du Cochon. Considéré comme un protecteur et source de prospérité, le Rat était le bienvenu dans les temps anciens. Il est le premier des animaux du cycle de 12 ans qui apparaît dans le zodiaque chinois. Le Rat est associé à l’agressivité, la richesse, le charme et l’ordre, mais aussi à la mort, la guerre, l’occultisme, les épidémies et autres atrocités. L’année du Rat peut ainsi s’accompagner d’évolutions politiques et sociales, avec de nouveaux régimes et gouvernements. De fait, l’année qui vient sera marquée par des élections dans un certain nombre de pays, notamment aux Etats-Unis, en Russie, en France et à Taïwan.

L’année du Rat en 2008 est symbolisée par 2 des 5 éléments astrologiques, la terre et l’eau, la terre représentée comme assise au-dessus de l’eau. La terre flottant au-dessus de l’eau ne reposant manifestement sur aucune fondation solide, toute stabilité pourrait s’avérer fragile en 2008, qui pourrait être marquée par des tensions sous-jacentes et diverses confrontations. Après l’extrême volatilité des marchés d’actions et leur vive correction en janvier, il semblerait que 2008 ait démarré comme il se doit. Maintenant que nous sommes en février, il convient de rester vigilant. Les investisseurs devraient prendre garde au fait que les pires mois de l’année du Rat sont février, août et novembre –sans doute une coïncidence, ce sont les mois oùdes montants considérables de CDO et de ABCP («Asset Backed Commercial Paper») vont arriver à échéance, ce qui pourrait provoquer une indigestion du marché. Globalement, 2008 est une année de décélération après la surchauffe économique des années 2006 et 2007.

Global Multi-Asset Group – Bulletin hebdomadaire - 4 février 2008

http://www.jpmorganassetmanagement.fr/vgn-…20%5BFRE%5D.pdf

Sachant qu’il est toujours possible de faire perdre des sous avec de bons conseils, vu que la réalisation pèse lourd dans la performance, mieux vaut dire ce qu'on fait plutôt que de donner des conseils.

Et tant pis si je me plante quand je vous fais part de mes prévisions, vu que l'idée sous jacente avec ce fil était

1 - avant tout proposer un lieu d’échange d’informations

2 - de faire profiter mes co-forumeurs des infos que je glane en ce moment de toute façon.

Au passage, comme je sais que les libéraux (contrairement à une idée reçue) ne sont pas bien fortunés, si je peux éviter à quelques uns de perdre des sous (vu que mieux vaut louper des gains que de risquer des pertes en entrant trop tôt), ou même en aider à améliorer leurs "placements retraite" (horizon >10ans : allez vers les FCP marchés émergents), je veux bien prendre le risque de passer pour un bouffon. :doigt:

Je préférais préciser ça dès maintenant au cas où l'avenir me donnerait tort… et encore une fois, cher POE, je comprends parfaitement votre réaction, et même je vous en remercie, vu qu’elle m’a permis de réaliser qu’il fallait peut-être clarifier ce qui précède. :mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Même en aider à améliorer leurs "placements retraite" (horizon >10ans : allez vers les FCP marchés émergents), je veux bien prendre le risque de passer pour un bouffon. :icon_up:

C'est quoi les meilleurs fonds émergents pour toi ? Ceux d'HSBC ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Je préférais préciser ça dès maintenant au cas où l'avenir me donnerait tort… et encore une fois, cher POE, je comprends parfaitement votre réaction, et même je vous en remercie, vu qu’elle m’a permis de réaliser qu’il fallait peut-être clarifier ce qui précède. :icon_up:

Pas nécessairement, c'était plus une boutade, je n'ai rien contre les prévisions, ni contre l'astrologie.

Tu as raison, dans l'absolu, ça va sans doute baisser, mais les analystes se trompent souvent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je pensais pas aux ETF, mais plus à des SICAV dédiées que je n'ai pas encore pris le temps d'analyser en détail, c'était histoire de savoir si vous aviez repéré des gérants talentueux sur ces marchés (parce que pour les pays émergents, il y a foutrement intérêt à savoir où on met les pieds).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@POE

J'avais compris le côté boutade, d'autant plus que j'aurais pu avoir la même réaction… :icon_up:

Comme je le disais, j'en ai juste profité pour "développer".

Je pensais pas aux ETF, mais plus à des SICAV dédiées que je n'ai pas encore pris le temps d'analyser en détail, c'était histoire de savoir si vous aviez repéré des gérants talentueux sur ces marchés (parce que pour les pays émergents, il y a foutrement intérêt à savoir où on met les pieds).

Je répondrai en citant à nouveau JIM ROGERS (passage du Podcasts posté plus haut):

JIM ROGERS: Well, Lindsay, I mean many academics and many consultants have demonstrated over and over again the best way for most people to invest in anything, stocks, currencies, whatever, is through an index. I’m not the first to come up with that and you either. That’s been demonstrated too many times. People who invest in indexes outperform 80% of active fund managers year after year after year.

So the best thing for most people to do is buy an index. I mean first do your homework and decide, “Yes, I want to buy stocks. Yes, I want to buy American stocks. Yes, I want to buy commodities,” whatever it is. And then if you decide you want to buy that asset class, the best way to invest, no matter what the asset class, is to buy an index.

En d'autres termes, si votre banque ou intermédiaire financier habituel vous propose des Fonds indiciels sur les marchés émergents, ça peut être le plus simple. Choisissez en fonction de la commodité pour vous et des frais qu'ils prennent. A ce propos, attention aux frais annuels, ce sont eux les plus douloureux et pas nécessairement les frais à l'entrée (souvent négociables).

Perso, j'ai choisis mon intermédiaire en raison du choix étendu qu'ils avaient dans leur gamme (d'autant qu'à l'époque il y avait très peu d'intermédiaires à proposer des fonds spécialisés Inde par exemple), puis dans la gamme j'ai choisis les fonds indiciels.

Mais, si vous ne souhaitez pas entrer dans le détail et que vous avez déjà un compte chez HSBC, ça peut suffire si ce sont bien des fonds indiciels. Par ailleurs, toutes les grandes banques proposent de plus en plus de fonds indiciels sur les "émergents" maintenant, alors ça ne dépend plus que des frais, de l'aspect pratique pour vous et du degré de précision que vous souhaitez avoir dans votre allocation d'actifs (choisir des régions ou des pays).

Dans un second temps, évitez au maximum les arbitrages. "Prendre des bénéfices" sur des marchés qui peuvent varier du plus de 50% sur un an est le meilleur moyen de casser vos performances bêtement, sachant que si vous y restez sur de très longues périodes, vous lisserez mécaniquement vos résultats. Une performance annualisée de 15% par an (calculée sur une période de 5 ans) correspond à "fois 2" en cinq ans et ça n'a rien d'exceptionnel…

Le meilleur moyen "d’arbitrer" est de le faire au moment d’augmenter votre épargne, en privilégiant un fond plutôt qu’un autre (et non de vendre pour acheter).

Pour les arbitrages, je citerais ce passage (d’un texte cité plus haut)

http://www.liberaux.org/index.php?s=&s…st&p=396247

Vous êtes sûrs de perdre en voulant être sur le marché au bon moment. (…) Les spécialistes n'y parviennent pas. La majorité n'arrive pas à faire mieux qu'un fond indiciel. Vous ne pourrez prédire quand sera le plus haut ni quand sera le plus bas du marché. Vous raterez forcément les 1% de jours qui donnent le meilleur rendement.

Pour conclure ce post, le jour où je repasserai à l’achat sur les émergents, je le dirais ici. :doigt:

Sur les actions, nous sommes dans un marché baissier dont la seule véritable inconnue est le rythme, et donc aussi la durée…

Or le timing est essentiel: "avoir raison trop tôt" peut se révéler très douloureux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je ne suis pas aussi pessimiste mais ça vaut la peine d'être pris très au sérieux…

En d'autres termes, vaut mieux être "liquide" et attendre. Ne vous fiez pas au rebond actuel et profitez en pour sortir; sauf positions très long terme (sur "émergents" et matières premières seulement) et capacité solide et déterminée à faire "le dos rond".

http://contreinfo.info/article.php3?id_article=1726

Crise financière : le krach parfait, par Martin Wolf

21 février 2008

L’économiste Marin Wolf, éditorialiste au Financial Times, reprend à son compte les thèses de Roubini, et détaille le scénario conduisant au krach financier et à une récession qui pourrait durer plus d’un an, rédigé par ce dernier. Y a t-il des chances d’y échapper ? Peu, juge Wolf, bien peu.

Par Martin Wolf, Financial Times, 20 février 2008

« Je dirais à mes auditoires que nous ne sommes pas face à une bulle mais à une mousse - de nombreuses petites bulles locales qui ne grandissent jamais à un point pouvant menacer la santé de l’économie dans son ensemble » Alan Greenspan, « l’Age des Turbulences ».

Voilà quel était l’avis de M. Greenspan quant à la bulle immobilière américaine. Hélas, il avait tort. Jusqu’à quel point ce ralentissement peut-il être douloureux ? Pour répondre à cette question nous devrions interroger un authentique pessimiste (bear). Mon favori n’est autre que Nouriel Roubini, de l’Université de New York.

Récemment, les scénarios du professeur Roubini ont été suffisamment sombres pour provoquer des frissons. Mais son opinion mérite d’être prise au sérieux. Il a tout d’abord prédit que les USA seraient en récession en juillet 2006. A l’époque ses vues étaient extrêmement discutables. Elles ne le sont plus aujourd’hui. Il affirme maintenant qu’existe une « probabilité croissante d’une issue « catastrophique » pour l’économie et la finance. » Les caractéristiques de ce scénario seraient selon lui « un cercle vicieux, où une profonde récession rendrait les pertes financières encore plus sévères, ces pertes énormes et cet effondrement financier rendant à leur tour la récession encore plus grave. »

Le professeur Roubini affectionne les listes autant que moi. Voici ses 12 - oui, 12, étapes vers le désastre financier.

En premier, vient la plus grande récession immobilière qu’aient connue les USA. Le prix des biens, dit-il, va chuter de 20 ou 30% en dessous des sommets atteints, ce qui détruira de 4 à 6 000 milliards de patrimoine. Dix millions de foyers se retrouveront avec un « patrimoine négatif », (ndt : endettés pour une valeur supérieure à leur logement), ce qui constitue une incitation majeure pour renvoyer les clés (ndt : à la banque) et aller voir ailleurs si l’herbe est plus verte. De nombreux entrepreneurs immobiliers seront ruinés.

(GIF) L’étape 2 verrait apparaître de nouvelles pertes, au-delà des estimations actuelles de 250 - 300 milliards, dans les emprunts subprimes. Près de 60% des contrats signés en 2005 et 2007 sont « imprudents ou toxiques » affirme le professeur Roubini. Goldman Sachs estime les pertes sur les emprunts hypothécaires à 400 milliards. Mais si les prix de l’immobilier chutent de plus de 20% elles seront bien plus élevées, ce qui diminuera d’autant la capacité des banques à offrir des crédits.

L’étape 3 serait celle de lourdes pertes sur les crédits - non garantis - à la consommation associés aux cartes de crédit, aux prêts d’acquisition de véhicules, sur les emprunts étudiants, et ainsi de suite. Le « crédit crunch » s’étendrait des emprunts immobiliers à une grande part des crédits à la consommation.

L’étape 4 serait la dégradation de la note attribuée aux assureurs monolines, qui ne méritent pas la note AAA dont dépend leur modèle d’activité. S’en suivrait une dépréciation supplémentaire de 150 milliards sur les titres gagés sur des actifs.

L’étape 5 serait un krach du secteur de l’immobilier commercial, et la numéro 6 la faillite d’une grande banque régionale ou nationale.

A l’étape 7 apparaîtraient de grosses pertes sur des LBO imprudemment conçus ( ndt : les opérations de rachat d’entreprises financées par l’emprunt) . Les centaines de milliards de dollars de ces emprunts resteraient peser sur les bilans des établissements financiers.

L’étape 8 verrait une vague de défaillances d’entreprises. En général, la situation des entreprises américaine est convenable, mais un nombre non négligeable d’entre elles ont une faible rentabilité et sont lourdement endettées. Ces défaillances entraîneraient des pertes dans les Credit Defaut Swaps, les contrats de gré à gré qui assurent ce type d’emprunt. Ces pertes pourraient atteindre 250 milliards. Des compagnies d’assurances pourraient également faire faillite.

L’étape 9 serait le krach du « système financier bis » (ndt : « shadow » c’est-à-dire les fonds d’investissement et les établissements non régulés). Traiter les problèmes rencontrés par les fonds d’investissement, les SIV, etc…. serait rendu plus difficile par le fait que ces établissements n’ont pas accès aux prêts des banques centrales.

A l’étape 10 la valeur des actions poursuivrait sa chute. La faillite des fonds spéculatifs, les appels de marge et les ventes jouant la baisse (short) pourraient entraîner une baisse des prix en cascade.

L’étape 11 verrait l’assèchement des liquidités dans de nombreux marchés financiers, y compris l’inter bancaire et les marchés monétaires, provoqué par une perte de confiance dans la solvabilité.

L’étape 12 serait caractérisée par « un cercle vicieux de pertes, de réduction de capital, de contraction du crédit, de liquidation contraintes et de ventes en urgence d’actifs évalués en dessous de leurs fondamentaux de prix. »

Voilà, selon Roubini, les 12 étapes menant au krach. Au total, affirme-t-il, « Les pertes dans le système financier atteindraient plus de 1 000 milliards et la récession économique serait plus profonde, plus durable et sévère. » Pour lui, c’est le « scénario de cauchemar, » qui trouble le sommeil de Bernanke et de ses collègues de la Réserve Fédérale. C’est ce qui explique pourquoi la Fed, qui avait si longtemps sous estimé le danger, a baissé les taux de 2% cette année. Il s’agit de prévenir un krach financier.

(GIF) Est-ce là un scénario plausible ? La réponse est oui. De plus, nous pouvons être certain, s’il se réalise, qu’il mettrait fin à toutes ces histoires au sujet du « découplage. » Si la récession dure 6 trimestres, comme le professeur Roubini nous en avertit, les politiques menées en réaction dans le reste du monde ne seraient que trop peu, trop tard.

La Fed peut-elle éviter le danger ? Dans un article ultérieur, le professeur Roubini donne les 8 raisons pour lesquelles elle ne le peut pas (il aime vraiment les listes !) . Les voici, en résumé. L’assouplissement de la politique monétaire américaine est contrarié par les risques encourus par le dollar, ainsi que l’inflation. Une politique agressive d’assouplissement peut combattre l’illiquidité, pas l’insolvabilité. Les assureurs monolines perdront leur notation, ce qui entraînera de sinistres conséquences. Les pertes dans leur ensemble seront trop élevées pour que les fonds d’investissement souverains puissent les assumer. L’action publique est insuffisante pour stabiliser les pertes dans l’immobilier. La Fed ne peut venir en aide au « système financier bis ». Les autorités de régulation ne pourront trouver une voie médiane adaptée entre l’exigence de transparence sur les pertes et celle de non intervention, qui toutes deux sont requises. En dernier lieu, le système financier, structuré autour des transactions, est lui-même en crise profonde.

Les risques sont bien sûr élevés, et la capacité des autorités à y faire face bien moindre que ce que la plupart espèrent. Il ne s’agit pas de dire que n’existe aucun moyen de s’en sortir. Mais malheureusement il s’agit de moyens toxiques. En dernier ressort, les gouvernements résolvent les crises financières. C’est là une loi d’airain. Les sauvetages peuvent exister, lorsque le gouvernement choisit ouvertement d’assumer la dette douteuse ou l’inflation, ou même les deux. Le Japon a choisi la première solution, au grand regret de son ministre des finances. Mais le Japon est un pays créditeur, où les épargnants ont une confiance totale dans la solvabilité de leur gouvernement. Les USA, au contraire, sont un pays débiteur. Il doit garder la confiance de l’étranger. S’il y échoue, la solution inflationniste devient probable. Voila qui explique suffisamment pourquoi l’once d’or a atteint 920 dollars.

La connexion entre l’éclatement de la bulle immobilière et la fragilité du système financier a donné naissance à des dangers considérables, pour les USA et le reste du monde. Les pouvoirs publics américains, au premier rang desquels la Fed, ont commencé à agir. Au bout du compte, ils réussiront. Mais cette histoire risque d’être affreusement pénible.

A plus court terme, quand je découvre ce matin le violent rebond du DJ hier soir, juste avant la clôture, et seulement en raison d'une info sur ambac… que ceux qui s'intéressent au court terme regardent la courbe intraday… Moi j'suis :icon_up:

Bon en même temps, c'est du tragicomique… :doigt:

EDIT:

Je précise que je ne fais JAMAIS (et n'ai jamais fait) "d'intraday"… et heureusement quand on voit ce genre de "foutage de gueule"

Je me contente d'observer et de suivre l'analyse technique juste comme ça (ou en renfort d'une analyse fondamentale pour affiner le timing)…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ La Fougère:

Merci de ces conseils, c'est très sympa, mais je travaille sur les marchés financiers, c'était juste parce que je ne connaissais pas les meilleurs fonds émergents… :icon_up:

Cela dit, en intraday, il y a parfois de l'argent à se faire, il y a des décalages évidents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Je pensais pas aux ETF, mais plus à des SICAV dédiées que je n'ai pas encore pris le temps d'analyser en détail, c'était histoire de savoir si vous aviez repéré des gérants talentueux sur ces marchés (parce que pour les pays émergents, il y a foutrement intérêt à savoir où on met les pieds).

Ces ETFs prennent les plus grosses valeurs des bourses de pays émergents. C'est utile pour prendre des tendances lourdes.

Bon, après, si tu veux faire du stock picking, va falloir méchamment se renseigner sur les valeurs en question. Et à la vitesse où vont les marchés émergents, il est sans doute plus simple de prendre un tracker.

Perso, je suis plutôt sur les tendances lourdes plus que sur des valeurs en particulier.

et pour les trackers, en terme de frais, les ETFs les plus liquides (spread bid/ask le plus petit) coutent bien moins cher qu'un fond. Et c'est surtout vrai pour les indices les plus connus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@ La Fougère:

Merci de ces conseils, c'est très sympa, mais je travaille sur les marchés financiers, c'était juste parce que je ne connaissais pas les meilleurs fonds émergents… :icon_up:

Cela dit, en intraday, il y a parfois de l'argent à se faire, il y a des décalages évidents.

Ok j'ignorais que vous étiez dans ce métier. Quelle branche? Quelle activité?

De toute façon, je tiens à être lisible et compréhensible par tous mes co-forumeurs ici, donc j'aurais "vulgarisé" (et détaillé) de toute façon.

Pour ce qui est de l'intraday, j'estime que le rapport rendement / temps passé est trop défavorable en ce qui me concerne. Maintenant, 1°) si on est un pro 2°) si pour son boulot on passe de toute façon sa journée devant les écrans, 3°) et que l'on est un peu doué pour ça… je veux bien… :doigt:

Maintenant faut voir la performance 1°) globale sur un an, 2°) rapportée au risque encouru et 3°) rapportée au temps passé… Et là, il y en a peu qui s'en sortent vraiment, surtout en terme de rendement/risque. :mrgreen:

Je reviens sur ce post

Donc faut prendre du DBA (ETF sur des futures de blé, mais, sucre et soja) : http://www.powershares.com/products/overview.aspx?ticker=DBA et du futur d'or

sinon, il vient de sortir le GCC (etf sur corn, wheat, soybeans, live cattle, lean hogs, gold, platinum, silver, copper, coffee, sugar, cotton, orange juice, crude oil, heating oil and natural gas) http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=gcc

Pour ce qui est de l'or, je suppose que tu connais?:

http://000999.forumactif.com/portal.htm

Pour l'or, j'éviterai les "futur" à moins que tu ne sois hyper sûr de toi. A long terme en revanche (sans effet de levier ni valeur temps), je crois qu'il y a peu de risques:

Un bon moyen de mieux comprendre la hausse de l'or est de comparer les devises comme ici:

http://000999.forumactif.com/les-hard-inve…ase-2-t7345.htm

[edit n°2: correction dans la formulation sur ce qui précède]

A voir aussi :

post-548-1203783065_thumb.png

EDIT

Ce qu'il faut voir (pour les néophytes) est que nous sommes à mi chemin des plus haut de 1980…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok j'ignorais que vous étiez dans ce métier. Quelle branche? Quelle activité?

De toute façon, je tiens à être lisible et compréhensible par tous mes co-forumeurs ici, donc j'aurais "vulgarisé" (et détaillé) de toute façon.

Pour ce qui est de l'intraday, j'estime que le rapport rendement / temps passé est trop défavorable en ce qui me concerne. Maintenant, 1°) si on est un pro 2°) si pour son boulot on passe de toute façon sa journée devant les écrans, 3°) et que l'on est un peu doué pour ça… je veux bien… :icon_up:

Maintenant faut voir la performance 1°) globale sur un an, 2°) rapportée au risque encouru et 3°) rapportée au temps passé… Et là, il y en a peu qui s'en sortent vraiment, surtout en terme de rendement/risque. :doigt:

Je bosse dans la gestion d'actifs spécialisée en obligs et actions européennes (d'où ma question sur les émergents, histoire de connaitre ceux qui sont reputés, chez mes concurrents).

Sinon, pour l'intraday, je suis globalement d'accord avec toi, mais il y a parfois des coups à faire, dont on peut tirer rapidement parti.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

je ne m'intéresse pas beaucoup aux fonds, je voulais savoir "émergents" ça veut dire la Chine aussi ? Parce que très franchement les actifs chinois sont surévalués en général. Je ne mettrais pas un kopeck sur un fond chinois.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EDIT

Ce qu'il faut voir (pour les néophytes) est que nous sommes à mi chemin des plus haut de 1980…

D'abord, tout le monde connait les prix passés de l'or mais ce marché est particulièrement efficient et ca métonnerai que l'on puisse gagner de l'argent avec ce genre de constat.

Il y a en plus une grosse différence entre maintenant et la fin des années 1970 : les niveaux d'inflation, tous les pays connaissaient alors des taux proches de 10 %/an. Seul l'or semble garantir le maintien du pouvoir d'achat en période de fortes inflation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
D'abord, tout le monde connait les prix passés de l'or mais ce marché est particulièrement efficient et ca métonnerai que l'on puisse gagner de l'argent avec ce genre de constat.

Il y a en plus une grosse différence entre maintenant et la fin des années 1970 : les niveaux d'inflation, tous les pays connaissaient alors des taux proches de 10 %/an. Seul l'or semble garantir le maintien du pouvoir d'achat en période de fortes inflation.

ça tombe bien, le cpi us vient de passer à 4% et l'or montent avec.

l'or a pris environt 50% en 1 an tout de même.

je ne m'intéresse pas beaucoup aux fonds, je voulais savoir "émergents" ça veut dire la Chine aussi ? Parce que très franchement les actifs chinois sont surévalués en général. Je ne mettrais pas un kopeck sur un fond chinois.

ça dépend de ton produit, faut lire la composition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...