Jump to content
José

Prix du pétrole : du puit à la pompe

Recommended Posts

The End of Cheap Oil?

The new cycle of resource nationalism is bad news

Ronald Bailey | July 17, 2007

Crude oil prices rose above $74 per barrel this week and Goldman Sachs warned that the world could be facing $95 per barrel oil by this fall. Later this week the National Petroleum Council (NPC), which advises the Secretary of the Department of Energy, will release a new report which will find that conventional oil and gas supplies are not likely to keep up with growing global demand over the next 25 years. Of course, supply and demand must balance, so what the Journal is telling us is that the NPC thinks high oil prices are here to stay.

The sobering news about oil prices was preceded by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Medium Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR). That report looked at energy supply and demand projections through 2012. The IEA was founded by the 26 members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) during the 1970s energy crisis to analyze and advise on global energy trends. The IEA projects the global demand for oil will rise by 1.9 million barrels per day or 2.2% per year on average, reaching 95.8 million barrels per day by 2012, up from 86 million today. Non-OPEC production is forecast to increase between 2007 and 2012 by a modest 2.5 million barrels per day. OPEC currently has spare production capacity of 3 million barrels per day and the IEA expects OPEC production capacity to rise by 4 million barrels per day by 2012.

Has the peak of world oil production arrived? The IEA report says probably not. The IEA notes that "the concept of peak oil production and its timing are emotive subjects which raise intense debate." Nevertheless, the IEA acknowledges that its new five-year forecast suggests that non-OPEC production "appears, for now, to have reached an effective plateau, rather than a peak." Let's put aside the question of how a plateau differs from a flat peak. The IEA reminds us that much depends on the definition of "conventional" oil production. Offshore oil was once unconventional and depending on technology and economics ultra-deep sea oil and tar sands may become conventional sources of crude. In addition, the IEA, while noting hydrocarbon supplies are finite, argues that the chief barrier to increasing medium-term production is access to reserves and the underinvestment in production infrastructure.

The resurgence of resource nationalism bears a good bit of the responsibility for the glum oil supply projections-what I've previously called "political peak oil." Seventy-seven percent of world oil reserves are owned by national oil companies. Unfortunately, national oil companies are located in technologically backward countries without access to world-class production expertise and adequate supplies of capital. As the IEA diplomatically puts it, "Often political and social spending needs grow to the point where oil exploration and development investment is compromised, in turn reducing oil and gas exports." And this is happening. Major oil producers such as Venezuela, Mexico, Russia, and Iran are using oil revenues to bribe their people and not investing enough to maintain future oil production.

To make matters worse, Venezuela is seizing a number of oil production projects operated by private international companies. Russia has done the same. Few investors are eager to invest in oil production in Iran and Iraq given current geopolitical realities. The IEA projects that there will no net expansion in oil production in Venezuela, Iran, Iraq, and Nigeria between now and 2012. In addition, spare global production capacity is currently at 3 million barrels per day and is expected to fall to 1.5 million barrels per day by 2012. Thus any disruption in production anywhere in the world will boost prices.

How much oil is left? The U.S. Energy Information Administration's International Energy Outlook 2007 calculates that world proven reserves of oil are 1.3 trillion barrels and projects that world consumption will rise to 118 million barrels per day by 2030. In 2002, U.S. Geological Survey researchers estimated that 3 trillion barrels of conventional oil remain to be recovered. "It's not peak oil: it's in the ground, we know where a lot of it is, but it's getting it out," said Leo Drollas, an oil expert at the Centre for Global Energy Studies in the Guardian.

The IEA report notes that the world has once before experienced a political boom/bust cycle in oil production. The previous bout of resource nationalism in the 1970s spawned high oil prices which, in turn, reduced demand and encouraged exploration for new supplies. Eventually, reduced demand and increased supplies combined to dramatically lower prices and which then cut the revenues flowing to oil state regimes. And the cycle continued as cash-strapped oil state regimes in the 1980s anxiously sought to boost their flagging revenues by inviting international oil companies to come back. The good news is that market forces eventually bring oil nationalists to heel. The bad news is that the process is far from pleasant for the world's economy.

Disclosure: Those 50 shares of ExxonMobil that I own are looking pretty good, but they don't make up for the amount I have to pay at the gas pump.

http://www.reason.com/news/show/121436.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bref, si la fin du pétrole n'arrive pas assez vite, il se trouve de bons léninistes pour accélérer de force le processus, artificiellement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bref, si la fin du pétrole n'arrive pas assez vite, il se trouve de bons léninistes pour accélérer de force le processus, artificiellement.

Ben en fait ils prolongent les réserves en en interdisant l'accès. Mon espoir est qu'ils se tirent une balle dans le pied en rendant de plus en plus attractifs les substituts et les économies d'énergie. Le succès fracassant de la New Mini aux USA aurait été impensable il y a 10 ans ou moins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sans pouvoir d'utiliser les hydrocarbons, on ne peut pas esquinter l'enivironnement.

Mais, ce ne sera pas tout bon, biensûr. La transition sera horrible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sans pouvoir d'utiliser les hydrocarbons, on ne peut pas esquinter l'enivironnement.

Mais, ce ne sera pas tout bon, biensûr. La transition sera horrible.

Donc si je mange des pâtes, c'est mal ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Donc si je mange des pâtes, c'est mal ?

Oui. Fais comme moi: plante des tomates, des fraisiers, des framboisiers et des vignes sur ton balcon :icon_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sans pouvoir d'utiliser les hydrocarbons, on ne peut pas esquinter l'enivironnement.

Mais, ce ne sera pas tout bon, biensûr. La transition sera horrible.

hydrocarbures

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Donc si je mange des pâtes, c'est mal ?

Non, ce qui est mal c'est de confondre hydrates de carbones et hydrocarbures=hydrocarbons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Non, ce qui est mal c'est de confondre hydrates de carbones et hydrocarbures=hydrocarbons.

Ine Inegliche: carbohydrates.

Merci de POE de tenter de ramener un peu de rigueur.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Il n'y aura pas de peak oil ou de transition rapide.

Les prix vont augmenter continuellement, rendant au fur et à mesure de leurs augmentations des solutions couteuses rentables. Cela va commencer avec l'exploitation de pétrole de moins en moins grande qualité, puis continuer avec la transformation du charbon en pétrole. On en a jusqu'à la fin du siècle, voir la moitié du prochain siècle! Bref, nous ne somme pas à la fin de l'ère du pétrole, juste au plein milieu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il n'y aura pas de peak oil ou de transition rapide.

Les prix vont augmenter continuellement, rendant au fur et à mesure de leurs augmentations des solutions couteuses rentables. Cela va commencer avec l'exploitation de pétrole de moins en moins grande qualité, puis continuer avec la transformation du charbon en pétrole. On en a jusqu'à la fin du siècle, voir la moitié du prochain siècle! Bref, nous ne somme pas à la fin de l'ère du pétrole, juste au plein milieu.

Oui, si vraiment les prix augmentent.

Hors inflation ils sont à peine plus hauts qu'en 74, c'est dire.

C'est cela le danger, que l'OPEP continue à nous endormir en gardant des prix bas, pour éviter les substituts.

Et je crois que les réserves sont surévaluées.

C'est l'avenir qui nous le dira

Xavier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C'est cela le danger, que l'OPEP continue à nous endormir en gardant des prix bas, pour éviter les substituts.

Et si les fabriquants d'écrans plats nous endorment en pratiquant des prix de plus en plus bas? Ou les plombiers? Nous sommes entourés de dangers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sur le pétrole cher, voici ce qu'on trouve dans Barron's cette semaine:

Here's the long and short of oil: prices of crude will remain high through 2008, helped by a falling dollar and production shortfalls in Mexico and Venezuela. But eventually oil will take a hard fall, maybe as early as 2009.

And when oil's swan dive finally does arrive, it will be disastrous for Washington's twin pets -- ethanol and wind power.

"We've gone back as far as 1995 to look at the long-term trend in demand," he says. "It has increased by 1.5% per year. Consumers have used 300 billion barrels of oil and 330 billion barrels have been found. So in terms of supply, we're in good shape," he says.

The day the Iraq war began, oil was around $33 per barrel. Since then, demand hasn't jumped and Iraq is again producing some crude, but oil prices have more than doubled. Says Kurtzman: "We've had three or four years of steady demand and increases in supplies yet prices -- it doesn't add up. I think we're going to see a drop that could be fairly precipitous."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Et je crois que les réserves sont surévaluées.

Grâce à mes contacts haut-placés dans une certaine grande compagnie pétrolière européenne, je sais pertinemment que c'est même le contraire.

@Nick: cela rejoint ce que je disais il y a quelques semaines: le baril va redescendre en dessous de $50 à terme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grâce à mes contacts haut-placés dans une certaine grande compagnie pétrolière européenne, je sais pertinemment que c'est même le contraire.

@Nick: cela rejoint ce que je disais il y a quelques semaines: le baril va redescendre en dessous de $50 à terme.

Allez, un peu de courage, à quel terme ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@Nick: cela rejoint ce que je disais il y a quelques semaines: le baril va redescendre en dessous de $50 à terme.

Etant donné que je vois la hausse des matières premières comme un rattrapage des prix par rapport à l'inflation (en dollars courants, on est toujours en dessous des prix de 1979) je vois mal ces mêmes prix redescendre significativement sur le long terme.

Sinon, je suis en effet d'accord avec vous que l'on joue à se faire peur, histoire de faire monter les cours, ça fait 30 ans qu'on parle de peak oil….

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
… cela rejoint ce que je disais il y a quelques semaines: le baril va redescendre en dessous de $50 à terme.

:icon_up: J'attends…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On admirera sur le graphe la remarquable correlation entre l'or et le petrole. Le truc? Il faut bcp d'énergie pour extraire de l'or.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LONDRES (AFP) - Les cours du pétrole ont atteint vendredi de nouveaux records à Londres et à New York, poussés par les tensions géopolitiques, la fonte des stocks américains et la faiblesse du dollar.

A New York, le baril de "light sweet crude" s'est hissé au prix jamais vu de 92,22 dollars. Vers 16H00 GMT, le baril pour livraison en décembre valait 91,46 dollars.

De son côté, le baril de Brent de la mer du Nord taquine à présent le seuil des 90 dollars. Vendredi, il a grimpé jusqu'au prix record de 89,30 dollars. Vers 16H00 GMT, le baril pour livraison en décembre coûtait 88,51 dollars. En un mois, les prix du pétrole ont pris plus de dix dollars aussi bien à Londres qu'à New York. Sur un an, l'escalade est vertigineuse: le pétrole a pris environ 30 dollars, soit une hausse de 50% environ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On admirera sur le graphe la remarquable correlation entre l'or et le petrole.

Quelqu'un peut calculer un petit coefficient de corrélation ? :icon_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

L'idée qu'un ajustement par les prix puisse resoudre à lui seul et de manière satisfaisante la crise énergétique releve d'un acte de fois.

Pour prendre un exemple, si l'aprovisionnement d'une ville en nourriture conventionnelle baisse regulierement et indefinimiment, la consommation de rat, puis de semelle de chaussure, puis de viande humaine devient rapidement concurrentielle. Doit on en dire " l'equilibre de marché est atteint?".

Penser que l'apres peak oil nous amenera mécaniquement par ajustement des prix et reorientation de capitaux vers des energie alternative en quantité et qualité suffisante c'est tenir le raisonnement de marie antoinette " il n'y a plus de pain? qu'ils mangent de la brioche". Les ordres de grandeur en jeu ne laissent aucune chance de transition "douce".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
L'idée qu'un ajustement par les prix puisse resoudre à lui seul et de manière satisfaisante la crise énergétique releve d'un acte de fois.

Des fois, il faut croire.

Pour prendre un exemple, si l'aprovisionnement d'une ville en nourriture conventionnelle baisse regulierement et indefinimiment, la consommation de rat, puis de semelle de chaussure, puis de viande humaine devient rapidement concurrentielle. Doit on en dire " l'equilibre de marché est atteint?". Penser que l'apres peak oil nous amenera mécaniquement par ajustement des prix et reorientation de capitaux vers des energie alternative en quantité et qualité suffisante c'est tenir le raisonnement de marie antoinette " il n'y a plus de pain? qu'ils mangent de la brioche". Les ordres de grandeur en jeu ne laissent aucune chance de transition "douce".

Quoique l'état puisse proposer, il fera toujours moins bien que ce foutu équilibre de marché.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Arn0
L'idée qu'un ajustement par les prix puisse resoudre à lui seul et de manière satisfaisante la crise énergétique releve d'un acte de fois.

Pour prendre un exemple, si l'aprovisionnement d'une ville en nourriture conventionnelle baisse regulierement et indefinimiment, la consommation de rat, puis de semelle de chaussure, puis de viande humaine devient rapidement concurrentielle. Doit on en dire " l'equilibre de marché est atteint?".

Penser que l'apres peak oil nous amenera mécaniquement par ajustement des prix et reorientation de capitaux vers des energie alternative en quantité et qualité suffisante c'est tenir le raisonnement de marie antoinette " il n'y a plus de pain? qu'ils mangent de la brioche". Les ordres de grandeur en jeu ne laissent aucune chance de transition "douce".

Je ne vois pas trop où tu veux en venir ? Si une crise est inévitable et bien effectivement on ne peut pas l'éviter.

Si jamais tu veux dire que l'état doit intervenir je me demande bien ce qu'il doit faire ? Augmenter les taxes sur le pétrole ? Dans ce cas là la transition serait encore plus abrupte et encore moins douce. Investir dans des énergies alternatives ? Pourquoi le ferait-il mieux que les entreprises privées ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je n'aurai absolûment aucun problème à ce que nous revenions vers la période pré-pétrole. Voltaire, Lafayette, Shakespeare ne se rendaient à leur bureau ni en transports en commun ni en voiture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

voltaire n'habitait pas dans une banlieue pavillonnaire à 20 km des foyers industriels ou commerciaux. Voltaire vivait dans un monde entierement bati et adapté à une energie chere et rare. 3 fois moins de population en france, ville dense construite sur des voies d'eau, habitat collectif dans les grande ville, village d'habitat continu dans les campagnes. Etc etc Voltaire vivait à une epoque de croissance quasi nulle, pas une epoque de decroissance.

La production d'ici une dizaine d'année baissera de 1 à 2% par an.

2 % par ans c'est 2000 000 de baril/jour en moins chaque année soit la disparition d'une quantité équivalent à la consommation francaise.

2 millions de baril par jour c'est 100 millions de TEP qui disparaissent tout les ans.

Il faudra dans le meme temps demanteller et remplacer la quasi totalité du parc nucleaire francais et une bonne partie du parc nucleaire mondiale.

Les optimiste situent le pic en 2030, la moyenne vers 2015 les pessimiste en 2005/2006.

Il y a d'autre facteurs à prendre en compte que le simple chiffre brute de production mondiale:

La production de petrole non conventionnelle est tres consommatrice d'energie. Il faut entre un tiers de baril d'equivalent petrole ( gaz nat en general, nucléaire demains). Remplacer 3 millions de baril de petrole de la mer du nord ( en baisse de 8% par an) par 3 millions de baril des sable de l'alberta correspond à une baisse de la production nette d'energie de 1000 000 de baril equivalent petrole.

le pic de production nette precede le pic de production globale.

Le marché export, le marché internationnal, represente la vente de surplus: production interieur des pays production deduite de leur consommation domestique. Les prix des deux marché sont clairement decorelé. La consommation des pays producteur de petrole croit plus vite que le rythme de production.

le pic de petrole export - dont depend la france à 99%- precede le pic de production globale.

Encore une fois le probleme principal du petrole n'est pas une question de reserve mais de rythme de production. Une nappe petroliere est une roche plus ou moins poreuse impregné d'une huile plus ou moins visqueuse, pas un lac souterain.

L'ecoulement du petrole dans la roche suis une loi basique de mecanique des fluide ( l'energie cynetique d'un fluide est egale au cube de la vitesse d'ecoulement), qui limite la possibilité de forcer le rythme d'extraction.

Obtenir une "courbe carré" c'est à dire maintenir le rythme d'extraction suppose d'atteindre des pression colossale dans les puits ce que ne permette pas les materiel existant, et ce qui demanderait des quantité d'energie colossale et rapidement superieure aux quantité d'energie extraite sous forme de petrole.

Une bonne partie des liberaux voit le marché comme le leniniste voyait son commissariat au plan: comme un mecanisme qui peut tout resoudre. Une economie de marché suppose pour fonctionner correctement à long terme un certain niveau de rationnalité dans les choix et la possibilité physique ( et pas seulement légale) de les mettre en oeuvre. On en est loin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Arn0
Une bonnes parti des liberaux voient le marché comme le leniniste voyait son commissariat au plan: comme un mecanisme qui peut tout resoudre.

Non, simplement comme un mécanisme plus efficace que l'État pour l'allocation des ressources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Non, simplement comme un mécanisme plus efficace que l'État pour l'allocation des ressources.

D'ailleurs le marché n'est pas un "mécanisme", le marché est tout simplement, et ce partout où il y a des êtres humains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...