Jump to content

Recommended Posts

il y a 17 minutes, Marlenus a dit :

Alors si on déroule son fil, son argument c'est:

Il y a 440M d'année il y avait 1100% de CO2 dans l'atmosphère par rapport à maintenant et c'était une boule de glace.

 

Donc il ne compare pas  les climats, il dit que le CO2 ne provoque pas de réchauffement (bon j'ai l'impression qu'il oublie juste les autres facteurs...).

 

Oui, j'ai vu ça :

 

D'ailleurs, la Terre boule de glace il y a 440 millions d'années... Ça vaudrait peut-être le cout qu'il s'intéresse à ce phénomène en passant : Quand la Terre était une boule de neige (il y a des choses sur le rôle du CO2, etc.)

 

Révélation

donnees.jpg

 

Mais vu qu'il considère que l'effet de serre n'existe pas, c'est assez cohérent qu'il parle également du pouvoir réchauffant du CO2. :facepalm:

Link to comment
il y a une heure, Philiber Té a dit :

Seulement, personne ne défend la théorie selon laquelle seul le CO2 contrôle le climat

Motte and bailey (mais je risquerais de paraphraser ce que j'ai déjà dit dans un post précédent).

Link to comment
il y a 26 minutes, Rincevent a dit :

Motte and bailey (mais je risquerais de paraphraser ce que j'ai déjà dit dans un post précédent).

 

Je ne comprends pas vraiment l'intérêt de répondre à une bêtise par une autre bêtise... mais je conçois qu'il y a des militants qui répondent à d'autres militants.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Quote

RL: You are touching on something that took me a while to understand. You know, Goebbels famously said, you know, if you tell a big enough lie and repeat it often enough it'll become the truth. There's been a lot of that in this, but there are aspects of establishing the narrative, i.e. what makes something the truth, that I hadn't appreciated. So the narrative was: the climate is determined by a greenhouse effect and adding CO2 to it increases it, causes warming, and moreover the natural greenhouse substances besides CO2, water vapor, clouds, upper level clouds, will amplify whatever man does. Now that immediately goes against Le Chatelier's principle which says if you perturb a system and it is capable internally of counteracting it, it will. And our system is.

JP: And you think that applies. Ok, so that's a very germane issue because even if... please go ahead.

RL: Let me finish because, okay, so that was a little bit odd. You began wondering where did these feedbacks come from. And immediately people, including myself, started looking into the feedbacks and seeing whether there were any negative ones or how did it work. But underlying it, and this is what I learned, if you want to get a narrative established, the crucial thing is to pepper it with errors, questionable things, so that the critics will seize on that and not question the basic narrative. The basic narrative in this sense was that climate is controlled by the greenhouse effect. In point of fact the Earth's climate system, which has many regions, but two distinct different regions are the tropics, roughly the minus 30 to 30 degrees latitude, and the extra tropics outside of 30 degrees plus or minus. They have very different dynamics. In the tropics... The crucial thing for the Earth, by the way, and this is a technicality, and much harder to convey than saying that greenhouse gases are a blanket or that 97 percent of scientists agree. This is actually a technical issue, the Earth rotates. Now people are aware of that, we have day and night, but there is something called the Coriolis effect. When you're on a rotating system it gives rise to the appearance of forces that change the winds relative to the rotation. And the only component of the rotation is the component that is perpendicular to the surface. So at the pole the rotation vector is perpendicular to the surface. At the equator it's parallel to the surface, it's zero, and this gives you phenomenally different dynamics. So where you don't have a vertical component to the rotation vector, motions do what they do in the laboratory, in small scales: if you have a temperature difference it acts to wipe it out. And so if you look at the tropics the temperatures at any surface are relatively flat, they don't vary much with latitude. On the other hand you go to the middle attitudes, extra tropics, there the temperature varies a lot between the tropics and the pole. We know that, I mean, temperatures are cold at high latitudes. And if you look at changes in climate's nearest history, what they consist in is a tropics that stays relatively constant and what changes is the temperature difference between the tropics and the pole. During the Ice Age it was about 60 degrees Centigrade, today it's about 40, during 50 million years ago, something called the Eocene, it was about 20. And so that's all a function of what's going on outside the tropics. Within the tropics the greenhouse effect is significant but what determines the temperature change between the tropics and the pole has very little to do with the greenhouse effect, it is a dynamic phenomenon based on the fact that if you have a temperature difference with latitude it generates instabilities. These instabilities take the form of the cyclonic and anti-cyclonic patterns that you see on the weather map. Now the tropics are very different. I mean, you know, even with a casual look at a weather map the systems that bring us weather travel from west to east at latitudes outside the tropics. Within the tropics they travel from east to west. The prevailing winds are opposite in the two sections, and we're saying that what changes due to the greenhouse effect, however you look at it, is amplified at the poles. That is not true. There's no physical basis for that statement. All they do is determine the starting point for where the temperature changes in mid-latitudes, and that's determined mainly by hydrodynamics. Okay, that's complicated to explain to someone, and yet, and yet it's the basis for claiming that these seemingly large small numbers... You know they're saying if global mean temperature goes up one and a half degrees it's the end. That's based on it getting much bigger at high latitudes and determining that. But all one and a half degrees at the equator would do, or in the greenhouse part of the Earth, is change the temperature everywhere by one and a half degrees, which for most of us is less than the temperature change between breakfast and lunch. And the thought that this is the end of the world, it's a little bit crazy.

JP: All right so let's play devil's advocate here first. And so let me lay out the narrative and correct me if I've got it wrong. So first of all the world at the moment is making a big deal out of climate and associating climate change with the greenhouse effect. The trapping of heat. And they're associating, we're all associating, the greenhouse effect with an increase in carbon dioxide, and at least initially we were associating that increase in carbon dioxide with with global warming, and then we've added the proposition that not only will there be warming, say of up to a degree and a half or two degrees, by the end of the century, and and maybe there's some variation in those predictions, but we're also looking at a system that's characterized by a variety of positive feedback loops. And the danger here is that a one and a half degree increase might not be catastrophic, but that that might trigger a sequence of cataclysmic events. We hear sometimes about the melting of the Greenland ice cap for example, the rapid rise in sea level that would occur as a consequence, the increase of temperatures at the poles, the release of methane as a consequence, let's say, of the permafrost thawing and then a runaway greenhouse effect because of that... And you evinced some skepticism about the whole narrative. But also more particularly and perhaps more importantly you don't sound like you're a big fan of the idea of runaway positive feedback loops.

RL: Well there are a lot of things enmeshed in what you've said. Even the one and a half degree depends on the positive feedbacks otherwise CO2 would be even less significant. Much less significant. You know you assume that water vapor increases and amplifies it, but the whole picture is one-dimensional, you'd have to know the area where water vapor is important and... it goes through a mess of things and we know now that that probably isn't occurring. Even people who support the narrative.

JP: The water vapor isn't amplifying carbon dioxide effects?

RL: Uh, if it is, it has to be considered as part of an infrared feedback and nobody has detected that that is actually positive.

JP: Okay well I heard that, I read that the punitive contribution of carbon dioxide to global warming is less than the margin of error for measurement of the effect of water vapor. Do you know if that's true? That's really sad if that's true.

RL: It is true if you want to measure it rather than hypothesize, then what you're saying is true. It's been hypothesized, in other words...

JP: So we're we're planning on spending two trillion dollars to remediate a problem whose magnitude is so small that it could easily be hidden within another measurement error on the water vapor front.

RL: I think so but I mean...

JP: That's really quite something.

RL: I mean it's caught the fancy of the political world. I mean, I'll give you an example of it. You know we're falling into the trap I mentioned, you know. Going along with the narrative, because it has so many weaknesses, ignores the fact that the whole picture of the greenhouse is misconceived.

JP: Okay well let's not go too far down that rabbit hole because I'd like to stay focused on the critique of the major narrative.
RL: I mean, you know, I'm quite willing to talk about the other problems, but the fact that you don't have this polar amplification, you know, that it's going to be bigger at high latitudes, it may be, but it's not due to the greenhouse. It's due to processes in the extra tropics where the greenhouse is secondary by a long shot. There's one example of what you're saying, and it helps I think understand why this issue gets so distorted. In one of the International Panel on climate change, you know this UN body, reports. I think the third report somewhere in the early 2000s. Where I was a lead author but we can get to that later. In any case they have these thousand pages that deal with the science. It have no index, is totally unreadable. And then they have a summary for policy makers which isn't really due to the scientists and they can manipulate the text because that comes out six months before the text of which it's a summary... But, you know, they know people aren't even going to read that. So you you have the thousand pages they're not going to read, then you have 20 pages they're not going to read, and so you have the press release. And the press releases the iconic statement and that's what gets the headlines. So the iconic statement was: they now are I forget how certain that, uh, most of the warming since 1960 is due to man. Okay. In truth that doesn't mean much. It was about a half degree, it was most consistent with the climate being relatively insensitive. It was basically a statement "there's not much of a problem here", but they didn't say that. They just said most of the warming since 1960 is due to man. All of a sudden...

JP: what is most mean, does most mean 95 or 51 percent?

RL: Could mean 51 percent. Even if it meant a hundred percent it wouldn't matter. It was small. But how did senators McCain and Lieberman respond to that? They come out immediately with a statement: this is the smoking gun, we must do something. So as long as the scientists can make innocent remarks and be assured that politicians will convert them into alarm and increase funding, why are they going to complain? And so you have this insidious interaction where scientists... And you know there's another guy, Steve Koonin, who's written this book, and I know Steve well, and you know the point is he could use the documents that are cited on behalf of alarm to say "look nobody here is saying it's the problem that the environmentalists and the politicians are saying, where did this come from?" And the answer is it came...

JP: Well Bjørn Lomborg has done the same thing. I mean he accepts the IPCC predictions, essentially, with some criticism, but says look well if they're right, this is straight from the horse's mouth let's say with regard to the UN, even if they're correct that'll mean two things. The first is we'll be slightly less rich than we would have been a hundred years from now because economic growth is so high, and we won't even notice that in some real sense, but even if it's slightly bigger than we predict we're so good at adapting, and you can see the curves for example in terms of number of people who are dying from natural disasters each year which has declined precipitously over 100 years, we're so good at adapting that the probability that we can just adapt to this is a hundred percent. Now that of course assumes that there are none of these runaway positive feedback loop effects. But my problem with that, on the scientific front, was well how the hell do you predict a runaway positive feedback loop? You can't predict that as far as I can tell.

RL: By the way the feedbacks are not runaways that they're using. They just amplify. You'd have to get a much higher level of feedback to be a runaway system. The tipping point is a different argument. And I find that kind of nutty because tipping points in the climate system are virtually unheard of and there's a good reason for it. They're usually characteristic of systems that have what I would call few degrees of freedom. So it's saying if you want to make a transition from one state to another you don't have many places to go so it has to take a leap.

 

NcPJ2ie.png

Link to comment
Il y a 22 heures, Marlenus a dit :

Le grand classique qui n'est pas corroboré par les faits.

 

Ho que si mais il est possible, pour le moment, de contourner la censure à l'aide de titres judicieusement choisis.

 

Ceci dit, le giec c'est effectivement de la merde.

 

Link to comment

C'est pas pour remettre une balle dans la machine, mais il me semblait que la terre boule de neige n'est qu'une théorie, encore discutée, et ils n'ont que plusieurs mécanismes différents et imparfaits pour expliquer les causes.. et les mécanismes de sortie de la glaciation complète. (Mais bon, ma source étant wikipédia, je laisse les experts s'écharper).

Le dioxyde de carbone est bien cité comme principal mécanisme de sortie possible, par contre.

Link to comment
Le 08/01/2023 à 20:00, Lancelot a dit :

Récemment je suis allé voir, par curiosité, se qui se passe du côté du fils de Peter. Je vous pose ça là comme ça :

 

Et il persiste, et creuse le sillon !

 

 

  • Yea 1
Link to comment
  • 2 weeks later...
Le 15/01/2023 à 14:37, Philiber Té a dit :

 

Je réagis juste sur ce passage là : pourquoi ces fluctuations passées seraient non-expliquées ?

 

 

 

Désolé de te répondre tardivement, je n'avais pas trouvé le temps de te répondre sur le moment. 

 

Il faut bien distinguer la question des variations passées et des variations présentes (comme celles de 2011 dans ton graphique) pour répondre à l'argument que j'ai cité. Il faut aussi distinguer les variations expliquées / Non expliquées et les variations anthropiques / Naturelles.

 

Le graphique que tu présentes semble supposer une connaissance exhaustive de ce qui peut être à l'origine des variations de températures. Mais que faire si dans le passé, il y a des variations importantes que l'on ne peut expliquer ? Est-ce que cela ne remet pas en cause notre capacité à connaitre de manière exhaustive les variations présentes ? Je pense plus particulièrement aux variations climatiques des 20.000 dernières années visibles à l'échelle d'un siècle ou deux (pour rester dans le même ordre de grandeur que le réchauffement actuel). Considères-tu que ces variations sont expliquées ? 

 

A cette question, je vois plusieurs réponses possibles pour défendre la thèse que cela ne modifie pas la connaissance relative à l'origine anthropique du réchauffement actuel :

1°) L'origine de ces variations passées est suffisamment expliquée,

2°) L'origine des variations présentes est suffisamment connue du fait des lois de la physique et de la modélisation. En ce qui concerne l'origine des variations passées, il manque simplement des données pour connaitre leur origine mais cela n'affecte pas notre compréhension du présent. De même les incertitudes sur l'identification de l'auteur de tel meurtre dans le passé n'affecte pas notre certitude que tel meurtre a été commis dans le présent. 

 

Quelle serait ta réponse à la question de savoir si notre ignorance de certaines variations climatiques passées affecte notre certitude d'avoir expliqué les variations actuelles ? 

Link to comment
Le 31/01/2023 à 21:55, Domi a dit :

Le graphique que tu présentes semble supposer une connaissance exhaustive de ce qui peut être à l'origine des variations de températures. Mais que faire si dans le passé, il y a des variations importantes que l'on ne peut expliquer ? Est-ce que cela ne remet pas en cause notre capacité à connaitre de manière exhaustive les variations présentes ? Je pense plus particulièrement aux variations climatiques des 20.000 dernières années visibles à l'échelle d'un siècle ou deux (pour rester dans le même ordre de grandeur que le réchauffement actuel). Considères-tu que ces variations sont expliquées ?

 

Non, toutes ces variations climatiques ne sont pas parfaitement documentées ou expliquées mais on connait tout de même les grands moteurs* du climat pour ces périodes (paramètres de Milankovitch, le soleil, les océans, etc.). Et par définition, il est plus difficile de documenter des événements passés que ce qui se passe actuellement sous nos yeux.

* On regarde en premier ce qu'on connait déjà avant d'accuser les GES.

 

Par contre, je n'ai pas l'impression que les variations climatiques passées soient utilisées comme des exemples pour pointer des changements ou des processus inexpliqués. Au contraire, il s'agit généralement d'exposer quelles sont les causes connues de ces variations et de montrer que l'Homme ou le CO2 n'y sont pour rien. Ces réflexions sur le passé vont de pair avec l'idée que le soleil ou les paramètres orbitaux ne seraient pas pris en compte par les modélisations, le GIEC, etc. mais seraient des facteurs ignorés volontairement.

 

Révélation

 

 

C'est encore différent de l'argument "le climat de la Terre est quelque chose de très complexe, donc on ne peut pas savoir s'il change, ni pourquoi ou comment"...

 

Tout autre sujet mais j'ai découvert que certains climato-sceptiques tentaient de ressusciter la théorie du pétrole abiotique... Je n'ai pas compris pourquoi, si quelqu'un a une idée. :jesaispo:

 

Révélation

 

 

Link to comment
il y a 34 minutes, Alchimi a dit :

Ben dis donc TIL. Mais à froid ça a l'air allègrement complotiste, pour le coup.

Il me semble que cette théorie avait été mentionnée en ces lieux il y a fort longtemps de cela (je suppose qu'il faut chercher "abiotique" ou "abiogénique" ou leurs équivalents en anglais).

Link to comment

https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2023/02/13/la-france-fait-face-a-un-fort-regain-de-climatoscepticisme-sur-twitter_6161691_3244.html

 

https://nextcloud.iscpif.fr/index.php/s/qiA5DJoGYMS2jHS#pdfviewer

 

Les Russes, les antivax, les climato-sceptiques, Elon Musk : il n'y a pas de hasard, il faut que les pouvoirs publiques interviennent pour mettre fin à cette désinformation intolérable. Bon, c'est déjà sur les rails

 

https://dailysceptic.org/2023/02/03/the-ministry-of-climate-truth/?fbclid=IwAR2tczQuRkg9DmRxvgWgoy_qaPZm2Uk9YqjdEXMbx0v8C5gKQxVbsuaFKqY

 

https://www.desmog.com/climate-disinformation-database/

(avec en prime, la note attachée qu'on m'a envoyée via linkedin)

arg.png

  • Sad 1
  • Huh ? 5
Link to comment
Le 13/02/2023 à 00:47, Philiber Té a dit :

Par contre, je n'ai pas l'impression que les variations climatiques passées soient utilisées comme des exemples pour pointer des changements ou des processus inexpliqués. Au contraire, il s'agit généralement d'exposer quelles sont les causes connues de ces variations et de montrer que l'Homme ou le CO2 n'y sont pour rien. Ces réflexions sur le passé vont de pair avec l'idée que le soleil ou les paramètres orbitaux ne seraient pas pris en compte par les modélisations, le GIEC, etc. mais seraient des facteurs ignorés volontairement.

 

 

En effet, j'ai plutôt exposé l'argument que j'aurais utilisé que celui qui est le plus employé en réalité.

Link to comment

Le petrole abiotique est une malencontreuse diversion sans grand interet. Le point important est nous avons du petrole, du gaz et du charbon (dont nous savons faire des liquides en cas de besoin) pour bien plus d'un siecle et, des lors, leur epuisement n'est pas un souci puisque ca nous laisse amplement le temps de finaliser les innovations pour passer a la suite.

 

Ergo, abiotique ou pas, c'est peu pertinent. 

  • Yea 1
Link to comment

2023 a déjà battu un record de sécheresse en France.

Je sens que l'été sera chaud et pas qu'en degré...

 

On est en février et déjà des départements prennent des restrictions d'eau:

 

Quote

La sécheresse des sols est aussi propice aux déclenchements des incendies. Dans les Pyrénées-Orientales, 60 hectares de végétation sont partis en fumée le 5 février. Ce département a également mis en place plusieurs mesures de restrictions d’eau. La semaine dernière, les Bouches-du-Rhône ont pour leur part émis un arrêté « de passage au stade de vigilance sécheresse sur le département ».

 

https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/environnement/article/secheresse-la-france-bat-un-record-en-hiver-avec-25-jours-sans-pluie_214162.html

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
3 hours ago, Nick de Cusa said:

On gardera a l'esprit que de tels evenements sur une zone representant un point minuscule de la surface du globe ne nous disent rien sur le changement du climat de la planete. 

Tout à fait.

 

Maintenant je pense que pour la plupart des gens ce qui leur importe vraiment ce sont les conséquences.

Pour reprendre mon exemple des agriculteurs, ils se foutent de savoir si les sécheresses qui sont en train de se répéter sont dut à un réchauffement climatique global ou à un anticyclone qui décide de s'amuser pendant quelques temps au dessus de nos têtes.

L'important c'est que les sécheresses sont là.

 

Si je devais faire une analogie c'est un peu comme les droitards et les gauchistes sur la délinquance.

Les droitards ont un coupable tout désigné, l'immigration et les nouarabes, tout comme les réchauffistes ont un coupable tout désigné aux sécheresses, le réchauffement climatique.

Alors qu'en face, les gauchistes nient le problème (le "sentiment" d'insécurité) là où de même, la grande majorité des antiréchauffistes nous expliquent par A+B que tout est normal dans tout ça, que dans le passé il s'est passé la même chose donc tout va bien.

 

Ben au final, confronté à un problème où un camp a une explication et où l'autre nie l'existence du problème, ben les gens vont naturellement vers les premiers et ceux même si l'explication est mauvaise.

  • Yea 3
Link to comment
il y a 1 minute, Marlenus a dit :

la grande majorité des antiréchauffistes nous expliquent par A+B que tout est normal dans tout ça, que dans le passé il s'est passé la même chose donc tout va bien.

Les climato-sceptiques ne disent pas que "tout va bien", et surtout n'empêchent pas les gens d'appliquer les solutions usuelles lors de tels cycles. Contrairement à l'état et aux escrolos qui 1/ rendent la bonne gestion de l'eau infernale, depuis des décennies et puis 2/ désignent des coupables imaginaires pour leur propre incurie (exactement comme pour l'énergie et le reste).

  • Yea 2
Link to comment
il y a 8 minutes, Marlenus a dit :

Les droitards ont un coupable tout désigné, l'immigration et les nouarabes, tout comme les réchauffistes ont un coupable tout désigné aux sécheresses, le réchauffement climatique.

Oui enfin dans un cas suffit de regarder qui commet les crimes, on est pas dans l'imaginaire d'une vache qui pète en Normandie et qui produit un anticyclone en Floride, on est dans la vraie vie où quelqu'un agresse quelqu'un d'autre

  • Yea 4
Link to comment
Il y a 3 heures, Marlenus a dit :

Si je devais faire une analogie c'est un peu comme les droitards et les gauchistes sur la délinquance.

Les droitards ont un coupable tout désigné, l'immigration et les nouarabes, tout comme les réchauffistes ont un coupable tout désigné aux sécheresses, le réchauffement climatique.

Alors qu'en face, les gauchistes nient le problème (le "sentiment" d'insécurité) là où de même, la grande majorité des antiréchauffistes nous expliquent par A+B que tout est normal dans tout ça, que dans le passé il s'est passé la même chose donc tout va bien.

 

Je suis d'accord sur le fait que les réchauffistes désignent systématiquement le réchauffement à chaque fois qu'un évènement perturbe la vie quotidienne (sécheresse, erosion, orages, incendies, grosses pluies, inondations, etc.)

En revanche ceux que tu appelles les "antiréchauffistes" (quel est le sens de ce mot ?) essayent d'une part de dédramatiser les conséquences d'un réchauffement et d'autre part de debunker les présentations apocalyptiques que font les réchauffistes des conséquences du réchauffement.

 

Bien entendu, nous trouvons des extrémistes également du côté des climato-sceptiques mais je constate que les medias, par sensationnalisme, ne présente que les hypothèses réchauffistes les plus dramatiques et désignent tous les climato-sceptiques comme des extrémistes.

  • Yea 7
Link to comment
3 hours ago, ttoinou said:

Oui enfin dans un cas suffit de regarder qui commet les crimes, on est pas dans l'imaginaire d'une vache qui pète en Normandie et qui produit un anticyclone en Floride, on est dans la vraie vie où quelqu'un agresse quelqu'un d'autre

Il "suffit", donc se taper X feuilles excel de stats et d'en extraire une certitude.

Stats que l'on va forcément te dire bidonnées, que l'on va dire que tu interprètes mal, etc.

Et à une feuille de stats qui va dans le sens que tu défends, on va t'en sortir une autre qui va dans le sens de ton opposant.

 

Tout comme pour le climat je te dis.

 

 

Mon but ici n'est pas de faire le débat sur la délinquance en France, on a des tas de sujets plus appropriés sur ça et si tu veux en discuter, vas-y je viendrais.

Juste de montrer l'analogie sur ce sujet entre les convaincus de quelque chose et ceux qui sont convaincu de l'inverse.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
4 hours ago, Rübezahl said:

Les climato-sceptiques ne disent pas que "tout va bien", et surtout n'empêchent pas les gens d'appliquer les solutions usuelles lors de tels cycles. Contrairement à l'état et aux escrolos qui 1/ rendent la bonne gestion de l'eau infernale, depuis des décennies et puis 2/ désignent des coupables imaginaires pour leur propre incurie (exactement comme pour l'énergie et le reste).

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec toi.

Bien sûr que dans les climato-sceptique (prenons ce mot), il y a beaucoup de personnalité différentes, mais dans ceux qui sont un minimum médiatique et avec du pouvoir, il y a pas mal de "Tout va bien, il n'y a pas de problèmes", Trump, par exemple, est totalement dans ce trip là.

 

Je suis d'accord avec @Calembredaine sur le fait que les médias vont bien sûr mettre l'accent sur les petites phrases les plus médiatiques, celles qui vont le plus faire parler mais malheureusement c'est le jeu médiatique.

 

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...