Jump to content

Armageddon économique ?


vincponcet

Recommended Posts

Pour le coup Vincent a raison.

Je n'ai pas dit qu'il avait tort. Je trouve que sa tendance obsessionnelle à placer les banques centrales comme Alpha et Oméga des problèmes financiers est un peu trop visible.

Sinon les journaleux de gôche prennent leur pied à parler du capitalisme qu'on ne peut sauver qu'en adoptant des mesures communistes. Et ils n'ont même pas totalement tort. Je crois qu'il serait utile de réintroduire des châtiments exemplaires pour les petits malins qui provoquent ce genre de désastre, des peines éloquentes, genre les écorcher vifs avant de les lâcher dans la nature les roubignolles en feu afin que le bon peuple puisse les poursuivre et les achever à coups de batte de baseball, un truc sobre mais fun quoi.

:icon_up:

Les premiers à châtier dans ce cas seraient, pour la France par exemple, des types comme de Robien ou Borloo qui ont honteusement accru la bulle immo en favorisant sans vergogne les montages financiers de pure spéculation.

A la racine de ces maux financiers se trouve bien, à n'en pas douter, des hommes politiques fervents démocrates.

Link to post

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=206…&refer=home

Democrats Seek to Add Subprime Relief to Paulson's Rescue Plan

By Craig Torres and Dawn Kopecki

Sept. 20 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson is sending a financial-rescue plan worth about $800 billion to Congress as Democrats prepare to turn it into a vehicle to help people with high-cost mortgages stay in their homes.

The Treasury will run the program to take on illiquid mortgage-related debt, with the Federal Reserve consulting on its design, officials said. Treasury aides are spending the weekend with congressional staff to negotiate a compromise that the House and Senate can vote on next week.

Paulson, Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke and other regulators are eager to stop a contagion of credit risk that has toppled three financial giants and forced one into a merger as capital flight began to squeeze Wall Street. Democrats are indicating they want to target relief for households by restructuring loans of struggling borrowers.

``We're going to be buying up a lot of mortgage paper,'' said House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank, a Massachusetts Democrat. ``Between Fannie Mae and Freddie now owned by the federal government and the mortgage paper we'll be acquiring here'' and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. running failed bank IndyMac Bancorp Inc., ``we should now be able substantially to reduce foreclosures,'' he said.

Frank said the Treasury was due to present the plan to lawmakers late yesterday.

$800 Billion

The program may be worth about $800 billion, split into $50 billion tranches, said four people briefed on drafts of the Treasury's proposal who spoke on condition of anonymity because details haven't been finalized. The funds, which would last for at least two years, will likely accept mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations, they said.

The Treasury plans to hire asset managers to purchase the assets through so-called reverse auctions, seeking the lowest prices, one of the people said. Congress will need to raise the limit for the federal debt to allow the government to borrow enough to fund the program, the person said.

Republicans warned against turning the bailout into an agenda.

``Congress and the administration must keep this plan as simple and straightforward as possible,'' said John Boehner, the leading Republican in the House. ``Loading it up to score political points or fit a partisan agenda will only delay the economic stability that families, seniors, and small businesses deserve.''

Last Resort

The Treasury is stepping up as the buyer of last resort for mortgage-linked assets that few other financial institutions in the world want to buy. To avoid giving a direct subsidy to Wall Street, officials must structure the fund so taxpayers either get fees, a high rate of interest, or some participation in the full recovery of the assets.

``Illiquid assets are choking off the flow of credit that is so vitally important to our economy,'' Paulson said yesterday at a press conference in Washington. ``As illiquid mortgage assets block the system, the clogging of our financial markets has the potential to have significant effects on our financial system and our economy.''

Senator Richard Shelby, an Alabama Republican who has advocated that markets should be allowed to penalize bad bets, warned that bailout could saddle taxpayers with large debts.

``This could be the biggest bailout in the history of the country and could ultimately cost $500 billion to $1 trillion,'' Shelby, the ranking Republican on the Senate Banking Committee, said in a Bloomberg Television interview yesterday. ``Congress is not going to rubber stamp something.''

Delinquencies Soar

Nearly one-in-10 American mortgages is delinquent or in foreclosure. The government would be buying debt backstopped by the U.S. home values that have been falling in value for eight consecutive quarters, according to the S&P Case-Shiller U.S. Home Price Index.

Senator Christopher Dodd, the Banking Committee chairman, said the plan's framers should consider the full debt load of U.S. consumers, possibly including credit cards.

``We'' have ``got some strong concerns about what's included here,'' said Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat. ``They haven't limited this conversation exclusively to residential mortgages. So I know that other securitized debt is also going to be considered.''

Investors are unlikely to tolerate partisan wrangling and brinksmanship. U.S. stocks surged in the biggest two-day global rally in history as talk of the plan began to circulate Sept. 18.

The House will pass legislation to implement the plan by the end of next week, and the Senate will act soon after, Frank said yesterday in an interview on Bloomberg Television's ``Political Capital with Al Hunt.''

Stimulus Spending

The temporary plan is likely to include a ``second stimulus'' proposal with infrastructure funds, low-income energy aid and Medicaid assistance, Frank said. Congress will begin weighing broad regulation of hedge funds, private-equity firms and investment banks when it reconvenes next year, he said.

Frank, in a separate C-Span interview, said he expects Wall Street executives to give up pay and other perks in exchange for the federal intervention.

Officials devising the plan ``need to make sure that they keep that hard-headed approach so that people are not profiting off this,'' said Martin Baily, who was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under Democratic President Bill Clinton.

``To some extent that's unavoidable,'' said Baily, now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington. ``Anytime you do something like this you have the problem of bailing people out and creating moral hazard. That's the reason why you hold your nose. But it's better than the alternative.''

To contact the reporter on this story: Craig Torres in Washington at ctorres3@bloomberg.net; Dawn Kopecki in Washington at dkopecki@bloomberg.net

Last Updated: September 20, 2008 00:04 EDT

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1221865490…tml?mod=testMod

* SEPTEMBER 20, 2008

U.S. Bailout Plan Calms Markets,

But Struggle Looms Over Details

By DEBORAH SOLOMON and DAMIAN PALETTA

The nation's top economic generals pressed Congress to move with extraordinary speed -- by next week -- to authorize a plan to bail out the U.S. financial system, but are still working to iron out enormously complicated details likely to generate controversy.

Under broad outlines of the plan, the Treasury Department will request the authority to run auctions using what Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said would be "hundreds of billions" of taxpayer money to buy illiquid assets from U.S. financial institutions. The goal: to stabilize markets and allow vulnerable firms to shore up their balance sheets.

Markets soared for a second straight day on news of the discussions. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 368.75, or 3.35%. Financial stocks led the rebound. Stock markets in Asia and Europe also rose sharply. The news also helped improve credit markets: Investors poured out of the ultra-safe Treasury bond market Friday, sending yields on the three-month T-bill up to 1% after briefly touching 0% on Wednesday.

Still, though members of Congress briefed on the idea generally voiced approval, lobbyists, policymakers and financial-services executives geared up for a fight over the details. (See related story.)

Among the measures announced Friday, the Treasury temporarily extended insurance, similar to that on bank deposits, to money-market mutual funds and the Federal Reserve said it would buy commercial paper from the funds. The Securities and Exchange Commission, meanwhile, banned short-selling of 799 financial stocks -- a financial bet that they will fall in price -- for at least 10 days. And the Treasury said it -- along with mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, recently taken over by the government -- would step up their purchases of mortgage-backed securities to help keep the housing market afloat.

The most ambitious part of the government plan is to create a new entity to purchase impaired assets from financial firms. The process could work as a type of reverse auction, in which the government would buy from the institution that sells its assets for the lowest bid.

However, the government may find itself in a quandary: Does it pay more than fair-market value for hard-to-assess distressed assets, putting taxpayers on the hook for any losses? Or does it drive a hard bargain, buying for pennies on the dollar? The latter approach would further hurt financial institutions, since they would have to write down the losses and take additional hits to their balance sheets. The Treasury department, which hasn't commented on specifics about the plan, is expected to propose issuing debt in $50 billion tranches to fund the purchases.

"I am convinced that this bold approach will cost American families far less than the alternative -- a continuing series of financial-institution failures and frozen credit markets unable to fund economic expansion," Mr. Paulson said at a morning press conference.

Others aren't sold. Douglas Elmendorf, a senior fellow at Brookings Institution and former Treasury official, said while inaction is a risk, the Treasury's plan could cost taxpayers a huge amount of money. "This approach saddles taxpayers with significant downside risk but limited potential upside gain," Mr. Elmendorf said.

People familiar with the matter say Mr. Paulson would like the new entity, which would buy and hold the distressed assets, established within the Treasury Department. The government would hire asset managers to oversee the entity, which would buy residential mortgages, commercial mortgages and mortgage-backed securities and other securities.

The Bush administration is asking Congress to approve its plan to buy distressed assets and is expected to work with Congress throughout the weekend. Details are being finalized but the administration wants authority to spend potentially hundreds of billions of dollars on these assets from financial institutions headquartered in the U.S.

Congress only has a narrow window in which to work. Leaders of both parties have pledged to move swiftly on a package. But it could face some horse trading because Democrats are expected to try to add some provisions -- and additional spending -- to help homeowners avoid foreclosure.

The moves are an effort to take a broad, systematic approach to the financial crisis after a series of incremental moves failed to stem the turmoil. The crisis has worsened over the past two weeks as credit downgrades, bad investments and falling stock prices have felled financial institutions such as Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. and American International Group Inc., a huge insurer.

While the Treasury department awaits approval from Congress it is also moving to start buying up mortgage-backed securities through existing mechanisms. The Federal Housing Finance Agency, a division of government that is effectively running both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, immediately directed both companies to purchase more mortgage-backed securities to help fund lending markets.

The Treasury department also plans to expand a program it implemented in the wake of its takeover of Fannie and Freddie to buy up to $10 billion in mortgage-backed securities debt issued by the companies in the open market. The Federal Reserve and the SEC also acted to stem the crisis.

The Fed acted before U.S. markets opened, effectively coming to the rescue of the money-market mutual-fund industry. Worried that money-market mutual funds weren't liquid enough to handle a wave of redemptions from nervous investors, the Fed said it would use its so-called discount window to lend up to $230 billion to the industry -- via commercial banks -- against illiquid asset-backed commercial paper which is widely held by money-market funds.

The asset-backed commercial paper market went through severe strain last year, because of holdings of troubled subprime mortgage debt instruments. Fed staff say that isn't a problem for the industry now, and that most of the assets backing the instruments it will lend against are auto loans and credit-card loans. The paper the Fed is financing is high-rated and Fed staff don't see it as a money-losing step.

The central bank is taking on a potentially big risk: If these assets fall in value or default, it may be on the hook, because the Fed cannot claim anything other than collateral as repayment. Officials say the assets are safe and the move is a temporary measure to provide liquidity to the market.

In another bid to provide liquidity, The Fed Friday, said it would buy short-term debt issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Federal Home Loan Banks through primary dealers. The Fed said it would buy up to $69 billion of these securities, called discount notes, to ease the crunch in the market.

The SEC ban on short selling of some financial stocks -- an attempt to stem some of the worst stock-market slides in years -- is effective immediately and will last 10 days, but could be extended for up to 30 days.

In short selling, traders borrow shares of stock and sell them, hoping the price of the shares declines and they can profit by buying them back at a lower price.

The SEC said it was acting in concert with the U.K.'s Financial Services Authority. The FSA said Thursday it would ban short selling in financial stocks until January, and would review the ban in 30 days.

Regulators in other countries quickly followed suit by tightening their own rules on short selling, including Ireland, Australia and France.

Bank of France governor Christian Noyer said Friday that the country's stock-market watchdog Autorité des Marchés Financiers would move to impose new restrictions on short-selling.

Commercial banks expressed skepticism about the Treasury department plan. They fear it may prompt investors to pull their money out of banks and place it in money-market mutual funds, which often have higher rates of return than commercial bank savings accounts.

The Independent Community Bankers of America in a statement said it was extremely concerned about the Treasury's announced mutual-fund guaranty program. "ICBA cautions Treasury not to propose any solution to Wall Street's turmoil that will drain funding from community banks, constraining their ability to fund local economic activity and growth and serve local communities across the nation."

—Jon Hilsenrath, Kara Scannell, Peter McKay, Joellen Perry, Elizabeth Rappaport, James R. Hagerty, and Cassell Bryan-Low contributed to this article.

Write to Deborah Solomon at deborah.solomon@wsj.com and Damian Paletta at damian.paletta@wsj.com

Je n'ai pas dit qu'il avait tort. Je trouve que sa tendance obsessionnelle à placer les banques centrales comme Alpha et Oméga des problèmes financiers est un peu trop visible.

Parce que la BC est l'alpha et l'omega du cycle de boom et de krach.

La BC induit nécessairement un boom qui finit nécessairement en krach.

Alors selon les époques, on retrouve cela dans les tulipes, les matières premières, l'immobilier, Internet, mais peu importe. Il y a forcément une bulle à venir, et elle trouvera forcément un débouché où aller.

Sans une BC, on n'aurait pas des cycles de folie en boom en des effondrements pareils ensuite.

La manipulation des taux d'intéret a une influence fondamentale sur la structure de production.

Link to post

Evidemment, le fait d'être sur la liste des entreprises que l'on n'a pas le droit de "short sell" devient un enjeu politique / lobbying.

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/comp…3-5ED44FE3EE10}

Companies try to scramble aboard SEC lifeboat

GE, CIT ask to be on list of stocks that can't be shorted, Amex may ask too

By Alistair Barr, MarketWatch

Last update: 5:18 p.m. EDT Sept. 19, 2008

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) - Several companies tried to climb aboard the Securities and Exchange Commission's short selling lifeboat on Friday. Some of them may succeed.

Under pressure from Wall Street executives, the SEC temporarily banned short selling of roughly 800 financial-services stocks on Friday to try to halt a market meltdown. See full story.

Companies omitted include General Electric Co., American Express , Capital One , and CIT Group, which all have huge financial-services businesses.

For GE, financial services make up about 45% of its overall business. A person familiar with the situation said the company has talked to the SEC about possibly being included on the list. American Express, one of the largest credit card companies, said it was just beginning to look into the possibility of being added.

CIT Group, a leading commercial lender in the U.S., "made a formal request to be added to the list," spokesman Curtis Ritter said in an email to MarketWatch.

A Capital One spokesman didn't return a phone message left seeking comment on Friday afternoon.

Guaranty Financial Group Inc. (Ticker: GFG) said Friday that it should be added to the list too. Guaranty said it is the second largest publicly-traded financial institution holding company headquartered in Texas and one of the 50 largest publicly-traded financial institution holding companies based in the U.S. ranked by asset size.

The SEC said it's willing to consider adding "comparable financial companies as appropriate."

"The Commission's order identifies banks, insurance companies and securities firms representing financial institutions whose securities are subject to sudden and excessive price fluctuation that threaten fair and orderly markets," the regulator said in a statement that was emailed to MarketWatch. "The Commission used the standard industrial classification codes to identify these institutions." End of Story

Alistair Barr is a reporter for MarketWatch in San Francisco.

Link to post
Parce que la BC est l'alpha et l'omega du cycle de boom et de krach.

La BC induit nécessairement un boom qui finit nécessairement en krach.

Nécessairement ? Prenons l'exemple de la banque centrale européenne : actuellement, sa politique monétaire est plutôt raisonnable (compte tenu des autres paramètres, bien entendu), notamment parce qu'elle a freiné certaines ardeurs sarkozyennes à forte odeur de relance inflationniste.

Link to post
Nécessairement ? Prenons l'exemple de la banque centrale européenne : actuellement, sa politique monétaire est plutôt raisonnable (compte tenu des autres paramètres, bien entendu), notamment parce qu'elle a freiné certaines ardeurs sarkozyennes à forte odeur de relance inflatonniste.

Comme quoi la BC n'est pas si facile qu'on le prétend.

Link to post
Nécessairement ? Prenons l'exemple de la banque centrale européenne : actuellement, sa politique monétaire est plutôt raisonnable (compte tenu des autres paramètres, bien entendu), notamment parce qu'elle a freiné certaines ardeurs sarkozyennes à forte odeur de relance inflationniste.

Si ajourd'hui, nous sommes en krach, c'est qu'il y a eu un boom induit par la BC.

Et la BCE comme toutes les BCs a baissé ses taux en 2001 ce qui a accéléré entre autre le mouvement de la hausse de l'immobilier.

La cause essentielle d'un boom, c'est l'abaissement artificiel du taux d'intérêt.

800px-LeitzinsenFR.png

Alors, certes, ajd, la BCE ne fait pas tomber ses taux comme la FED, mais elle met en oeuvre des procédures d'injection de liquidités qui n'ont pas grand chose à envier à celles de la FED.

Le simple fait que la BCE injecte des liquidités pour pouvoir tenir son taux directeur prouve que le taux d'intérêt naturel est au dessus de ce taux directeur.

Donc elle ne baise pas nominalement ses taux, ok, mais elle les maintient en dessous du taux de marché. Par cela, elle induira un boom à venir.

Quelque soit le domaine, un contrôle des prix a toujours les mêmes conséquences. Le prix fixé est plus bas que le marché, il y aura surproduction, le prix fixé est plus haut que le marché, il y aura pénurie.

La raison d'être d'une BC, c'est de faire baisser le taux du marché, elle génère donc de la surproduction dans le domaine du crédit.

Link to post
Si ajourd'hui, nous sommes en krach, c'est qu'il y a eu un boom induit par la BC.

Et la BCE comme toutes les BCs a baissé ses taux en 2001 ce qui a accéléré entre autre le mouvement de la hausse de l'immobilier.

La cause essentielle d'un boom, c'est l'abaissement artificiel du taux d'intérêt.

800px-LeitzinsenFR.png

Alors, certes, ajd, la BCE ne fait pas tomber ses taux comme la FED, mais elle met en oeuvre des procédures d'injection de liquidités qui n'ont pas grand chose à envier à celles de la FED.

Le simple fait que la BCE injecte des liquidités pour pouvoir tenir son taux directeur prouve que le taux d'intérêt naturel est au dessus de ce taux directeur.

Donc elle ne baise pas nominalement ses taux, ok, mais elle les maintient en dessous du taux de marché. Par cela, elle induira un boom à venir.

Quelque soit le domaine, un contrôle des prix a toujours les mêmes conséquences. Le prix fixé est plus bas que le marché, il y aura surproduction, le prix fixé est plus haut que le marché, il y aura pénurie.

La raison d'être d'une BC, c'est de faire baisser le taux du marché, elle génère donc de la surproduction dans le domaine du crédit.

Je voulais simplement émettre l'idée qu'en l'absence de BCE la situation aurait peut-être été pire (combien de gouvernants doivent la maudire puisqu'elle freine leurs velléités démagogiques).

Donc elle ne baise pas nominalement ses taux, ok, mais elle les maintient en dessous du taux de marché.

… mais elle baise les ménagères.

Link to post
Je voulais simplement émettre l'idée qu'en l'absence de BCE la situation aurait peut-être été pire (combien de gouvernants doivent la maudire puisqu'elle freine leurs velléités démagogiques).

En l'absence de BC, on n'a pas de boom prodigieux qui se transforme en krach fantastique, donc pas de raison d'interventions étatiques pour "corriger" les pbs du krach.

La BC est à la source de nombreux programmes de welfare state.

Par exemple, c'est du fait d'une inflation monstrueuse pendant WWII qui a ruiné l'épargne des vieux que l'Etat s'est trouvé tout justifié pour collectiviser la retraite.

C'est pendant la grande dépression de 1929 (krach causé par le boom de la BC) que l'Etat américain a fait un bon collosal vers le collectivisme.

Je ne comprends pas trop ce que tu défends en fait ? Tu défends la BC ?

Link to post
En l'absence de BC, on n'a pas de boom prodigieux qui se transforme en krach fantastique, donc pas de raison d'interventions étatiques pour "corriger" les pbs du krach.

La BC est à la source de nombreux programmes de welfare state.

Par exemple, c'est du fait d'une inflation monstrueuse pendant WWII qui a ruiné l'épargne des vieux que l'Etat s'est trouvé tout justifié pour collectiviser la retraite.

C'est pendant la grande dépression de 1929 (krach causé par le boom de la BC) que l'Etat américain a fait un bon collosal vers le collectivisme.

Je ne comprends pas trop ce que tu défends en fait ? Tu défends la BC ?

C'est reparti… Avant de te lancer dans ton sempiternel laïus, tu aurais dû me lire plus soigneusement.

Je te parle de la Banque centrale européenne hic et nunc, pas des anciennes banques centrales des pays composant l'Union européenne. Je dis que, sans BCE, il y a fort à parier que nous aurions eu une situation bien pire - les banques centrales nationales étant généralement aux ordres des gouvernements.

Link to post
C'est reparti… Avant de te lancer dans ton sempiternel laïus, tu aurais dû me lire plus soigneusement.

Je te parle de la Banque centrale européenne hic et nunc, pas des anciennes banques centrales des pays composant l'Union européenne. Je dis que, sans BCE, il y a fort à parier que nous aurions eu une situation bien pire - les banques centrales nationales étant généralement aux ordres des gouvernements.

En plus tu es pas vraiment un grand fan de l'Europe :icon_up:

Link to post
C'est reparti… Avant de te lancer dans ton sempiternel laïus, tu aurais dû me lire plus soigneusement.

Je te parle de la Banque centrale européenne hic et nunc, pas des anciennes banques centrales des pays composant l'Union européenne. Je dis que, sans BCE, il y a fort à parier que nous aurions eu une situation bien pire - les banques centrales nationales étant généralement aux ordres des gouvernements.

Tu es en train de me faire dire que je défends les BCs nationales ?

Si je ne te comprends pas, toi aussi, tu ne sembles pas me comprendre.

Le fait de parier à la baisse va bientôt devenir un crime.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=206…&refer=home

SEC Forces Hedge Funds to Swear Oath in Probe of Manipulation

By David Scheer

Sept. 20 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, seeking to jumpstart a hunt for suspected manipulation of financial stocks, will require hedge fund managers, brokerages and institutional investors to describe under oath their bets on the firms.

Investors with ``significant'' trades in the companies' securities or credit default swaps must disclose their positions and provide ``certain other information'' in written statements, the regulator said yesterday. SEC spokesman John Nester declined to say who would receive the requests.

Link to post
Tu es en train de me faire dire que je défends les BCs nationales ?

Si je ne te comprends pas, toi aussi, tu ne sembles pas me comprendre.

Inimitable !! :icon_up:

Non, je ne te fais rien dire du tout. Faudrait arrêter la pensée binaire de temps en temps, ça relaxe.

Link to post

Il me semble clair que si l'on ne veut pas de BCE, cela signifie que l'on ne veut pas de BC tout court.

Un systeme bancaire doit etre decentralise au maximum afin de coller au plus pres des demandes de liquidite. Un taux d'interet uniforme pour des millions de gens c'est une heresie, ca peut convenir aux politiciens mais surement pas a stabiliser le marche.

Le pire dans tout cela ce sont les malheureux qui ont contracte un pret immobilier sur 20ans, periode durant laquelle il y a fort a parier que le marche immo va crasher. L'argent actuellement "place" dans le remboursement va donc partir en fumee pour ces gens.

Mais sinon, il faut plus de regulation, bien sur…

Link to post
Inimitable !! :icon_up:

Non, je ne te fais rien dire du tout. Faudrait arrêter la pensée binaire de temps en temps, ça relaxe.

Attends, si en me répondant sur un post où je dis que les BCs sont responsables du marasme, tu dis que la BCE fait de bonnes choses, alors tu défends la BCE.

Maintenant, tu sembles dire que la BCE serait moins pire que les BC nationales qui prévalaient alors. Peut-être. Mais je n'ai pas parlé de cela, alors je ne vois pas pq tu me réponds en louant l'action de la BCE.

Il faudrait que tu fasses des posts avec un peu plus qu'une ligne, parce qu'à chaque fois, il y a tellement de sous-entendus, qu'il est étonnant de ta part de me reprocher ensuite d'interpréter.

Link to post
Attends, si en me répondant sur un post où je dis que les BCs sont responsables du marasme, tu dis que la BCE fait de bonnes choses, alors tu défends la BCE.

Maintenant, tu sembles dire que la BCE serait moins pire que les BC nationales qui prévalaient alors. Peut-être. Mais je n'ai pas parlé de cela, alors je ne vois pas pq tu me réponds en louant l'action de la BCE.

Il faudrait que tu fasses des posts avec un peu plus qu'une ligne, parce qu'à chaque fois, il y a tellement de sous-entendus, qu'il est étonnant de ta part de me reprocher ensuite d'interpréter.

:icon_up: Tu es surtout incapable de t'exprimer et de lire correctement. Tant pis.

Link to post
Nécessairement ? Prenons l'exemple de la banque centrale européenne : actuellement, sa politique monétaire est plutôt raisonnable (compte tenu des autres paramètres, bien entendu), notamment parce qu'elle a freiné certaines ardeurs sarkozyennes à forte odeur de relance inflationniste.

Oui, j'ai d'ailleurs moi-même changé ma position sur ce sujet depuis quelques mois, remettant en cause mon ex-stupide laïus sur la concurrence monétaire entre les Etats européens et estimant désormais que la situation monétaire actuelle est un progrès par rapport à celle qui prévalait en France avant l'euro.

Link to post
Attends, si en me répondant sur un post où je dis que les BCs sont responsables du marasme, tu dis que la BCE fait de bonnes choses, alors tu défends la BCE.

Maintenant, tu sembles dire que la BCE serait moins pire que les BC nationales qui prévalaient alors. Peut-être. Mais je n'ai pas parlé de cela, alors je ne vois pas pq tu me réponds en louant l'action de la BCE.

Il faudrait que tu fasses des posts avec un peu plus qu'une ligne, parce qu'à chaque fois, il y a tellement de sous-entendus, qu'il est étonnant de ta part de me reprocher ensuite d'interpréter.

Non je crois que la position de RH est très clair, il dit que la BCE a joué son rôle prudentiel correctement (à tort pour moi mais soit), contrairement aux banques centrales pays de l'Union Européenne. Mais il n'a pas soutenu, en soi, le concept de banque centrale.

Link to post
Non je crois que la position de RH est très clair, il dit que la BCE a joué son rôle prudentiel correctement (à tort pour moi mais soit), contrairement aux banques centrales pays de l'Union Européenne. Mais il n'a pas soutenu, en soi, le concept de banque centrale.

Voilà.

(Tu vois que l'honnêteté intellectuelle peut te réussir.)

Link to post
Non je crois que la position de RH est très clair, il dit que la BCE a joué son rôle prudentiel correctement (à tort pour moi mais soit), contrairement aux banques centrales pays de l'Union Européenne. Mais il n'a pas soutenu, en soi, le concept de banque centrale.

Il répond à un post de moi disant que les BCs sont générateurs de cycle, comme si son point devait invalider ma proposition.

Et j'aimerais bien qu'on m'explique en quoi les injections en centaines de milliards de la BCE dépuis 1 an sont "prudentiels" ?

Certes, elle ne nationalise pas tout, mais de là à la porter aux nues, je ne comprends pas.

Aussi, et c'était là que je me situais, le krach n'est que la conséquence du boom.

Et la BCE a joué le même jeu en 2001 que la FED, elle est tout autant responsable du krach actuel en europe que la FED l'est pour le krach aux US.

Link to post
… mais elle baise les ménagères.

Et du coup, elle a le cul qui brille.

Inimitable !! :icon_up:

Non, je ne te fais rien dire du tout. Faudrait arrêter la pensée binaire de temps en temps, ça relaxe.

J'ai correctement diagnostiqué : il n'a pas pris son Relaxafon 500, il a pris un Balzolac de trop, et maintenant ses sphincters sont tous fermés fermés fermés.

Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By Lugaxker
      On y est je pense.
       
      Baril de Brent : - 20 % aujourd'hui
      CAC 40 : - 6 % à l'ouverture
      Le S&P 500 va probablement aussi plonger cet après-midi.
       
      Indépendamment du contexte (le coronavirus qui a déclenché le mouvement), ça sent la nouvelle récession.
       
      Vous en pensez quoi ?
    • By Alchimi
      http://www.lefigaro.fr/medias/2018/05/24/20004-20180524ARTFIG00294-netflix-pese-desormais-plus-lourd-que-disney.php
       
      L'article:
       
      +2300% le titre netflix entre 2012 et 2017. Pas moche. Je crois que je vais aller leur proposer mon scénario de court-métrage de SF.
    • By POE
      Dans ce sujet, je souhaite aborder les différentes manières de considérer le sujet de l'emploi.
      Il y a par exemple, les aspects légaux : les types de contrats, leur formalisme, la réglementation sur le temps de travail, sur les horaires, les pauses, les dimanches, les vacances, les RTT, les représentants syndicaux, les licenciements...bref, c'est bien ennuyeux, et le libéralisme n'a pas forcément vocation à nous donner une manière de gérer ces problèmes autre que de dire que c'est le contrat de travail qui doit le faire, et qu'il ne regarde que les contractants. 
      L'autre aspect ce sont les charges qui pèsent sur les salaires, là encore, le libéralisme n'a pas vocation à se prononcer sur un bon niveau de charges, mais plutôt à laisser entreprises et individus s'organiser pour gérer les aspects sociaux liés au travail.
      Une autre aspect c'est celui de la formation.
      Un autre aspect c'est celui du chômage, du retour à l'emploi.
      Un dernier aspect c'est le dynamisme de l'économie, les freins qui pèsent sur l'économie.
      Bon, on peut considérer que les libéraux n'ont rien à dire sur ces sujets que de laisser faire les individus pour s'organiser eux mêmes.
      On peut aussi réfléchir sur chacun des domaines à ce qui pose vraiment problème, ce qui ne gêne pas trop, ce qui est utile...mais aussi. à ce qu'attendent les individus du système en place, ce qu'ils espèrent, et de l'autre, ce qui les entravent et les gênent.
      A partir de cette réflexion, nous pourrions faire émerger des solutions innovantes qui puissent à la fois satisfaire les attentes, et l'utilité, en se rapprochant de l'idéal libéral c'est à dire la liberté, l'autonomie des individus.
       
    • By Axpoulpe
      Nous y sommes, la solution de mise à l'échelle imaginée par l'équipe de Bitcoin Core est lancée pour de bon, même si c'est encore en phase de test mais déjà sur le main net. @h16 a qualifié cette solution de vaste blague, ou un truc du genre. Moi-même je n'ai pas les connaissances techniques pour juger son jugement, mais pour la première fois j'ai pu entendre des explications plus détaillées que les courtes vidéos, et des réponses aux objections courantes, dans ce podcast. Tout ça m'a semblé plutôt convaincant, mais je suis conscient de mon biais de jugement chaque fois que c'est Antonopoulos qui s'exprime. Globalement j'ai quand même du mal à croire que l'équipe de développement de la plus grosse capitalisation dans le monde des cryptos aurait foiré au point de suicider sa monnaie. Les sommes en jeu sont trop grandes. Et puis du côté de Bitcoin Cash il me semble que l'augmentation de la taille des blocs ne peut pas être une solution à long terme en cas d'adoption, non ?
       
      Bref, je suis intéressé par vos commentaires sur la question !
       
       
    • By Adrian
      Kenneth Arrow, economist, 1921-2017Nobel Prize winner who influenced thinking on welfare and social choice
       
      Sur wikiberal
       
      Je me suis avoir écrit la "preuve" de son théorème d’impossibilité.Il ne reste plus beaucoup d'économiste néo-classique post WW2 ...
       
×
×
  • Create New...